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1 To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven: 2 A time to be born, and a time to die; a time to plant, and a time to pluck up that which is planted; 3 A time to kill, and a time to heal; a time to break down, and a time to build up; 4 A time to weep, and a time to laugh; a time to mourn, and a time to dance; 5 A time to cast away stones, and a time to gather stones together; a time to embrace, and a time to refrain from embracing; 6 A time to get, and a time to lose; a time to keep, and a time to cast away; 7 A time to rend, and a time to sew; a time to keep silence, and a time to speak; 8 A time to love, and a time to hate; a time of war, and a time of peace. 9 What profit hath he that worketh in that wherein he laboureth? 10 I have seen the travail, which God hath given to the sons of men to be exercised in it. 11 He hath made every thing beautiful in his time: also he hath set the world in their heart, so that no man can find out the work that God maketh from the beginning to the end. 12 I know that there is no good in them, but for a man to rejoice, and to do good in his life. 13 And also that every man should eat and drink, and enjoy the good of all his labour, it is the gift of God. 14 I know that, whatsoever God doeth, it shall be for ever: nothing can be put to it, nor any thing taken from it: and God doeth it, that men should fear before him. 15 That which hath been is now; and that which is to be hath already been; and God requireth that which is past. 16 And moreover I saw under the sun the place of judgment, that wickedness was there; and the place of righteousness, that iniquity was there. 17 I said in mine heart, God shall judge the righteous and the wicked: for there is a time there for every purpose and for every work. 18 I said in mine heart concerning the estate of the sons of men, that God might manifest them, and that they might see that they themselves are beasts. 19 For that which befalleth the sons of men befalleth beasts; even one thing befalleth them: as the one dieth, so dieth the other; yea, they have all one breath; so that a man hath no preeminence above a beast: for all is vanity. 20 All go unto one place; all are of the dust, and all turn to dust again. 21 Who knoweth the spirit of man that goeth upward, and the spirit of the beast that goeth downward to the earth? 22 Wherefore I perceive that there is nothing better, than that a man should rejoice in his own works; for that is his portion: for who shall bring him to see what shall be after him?

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1 Cary W = "All things in Heaven and all of God's glorious purposes shall be  made manifest here on earth, its perfect season and time."
2 Raymond Huerta = "The seven verses that begin here are the first instance of poetry in Ecclesiastes. There are seven paired lines, with the number seven specifically chosen because of its traditional association with the sacred throughout the Bible.See the following verses for examples:Genesis 2:2Genesis 4:15 Genesis 7:2 Genesis 41 Exodus 13:6-7 Leviticus 4:6 Leviticus 25:8-9 For a more comprehensive list see:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/7_(number)#Religion_and_mythologyWorks cited:Alter, Robert. "Ecclesiastes 3." The Wisdom Books : Job, Proverbs, and Ecclesiastes. New York: W.W. Norton, 2010. Print."
3 Raymond Huerta = "This is an intentional pairing in each pair of lines; life and death for humans; planting and unrooting of plants; a time for killing and healing; destroying and building; crying and laughing; mourning and celebrating. Alter, Robert. "Ecclesiastes 3." The Wisdom Books : Job, Proverbs, and Ecclesiastes. New York: W.W. Norton, 2010. Print."
4 Shawn Bose = "This 'seasonal' theme from Ecclesiastes has been the inspiration for many artists from poetry to music. Perhaps most famously in by The Byrds in their hit song "Turn, Turn, Turn""
5 Raymond Huerta = "This verse is a bit different from the previous verses in that doesn't it seem to have a clear pairing between stones and embracing. Being the only verse in the poem without distinct pairing, there has been many explanations to this occurrence. The most prominent interpretation is that the casting away and gathering of stones are a metaphor for ejaculation and refraining from ejaculation. This interpretation would pair up the stones and embracing and continue the structure of the poem. Koosed, Jennifer L. "Qohelet in Pleasure and Pain." (Per)mutations of Qohelet Reading the Body in the Book. New York: T & T Clark, 2006. Print.Alter, Robert. "Ecclesiastes 3." The Wisdom Books : Job, Proverbs, and Ecclesiastes. New York: W.W. Norton, 2010. Print."
6 Raymond Huerta = "This could refer to acts of mourning and the emergence from mourning, which is coupled to "silence" and "speak" in the next line. Alter, Robert. "Ecclesiastes 3." The Wisdom Books : Job, Proverbs, and Ecclesiastes. New York: W.W. Norton, 2010. Print."
7 Raymond Huerta = "These two verses taken together could encompass the philosophical points present throughout the poem. The contradictory events of human life, both good and bad, are beyond man's control. Alter, Robert. "Ecclesiastes 3." The Wisdom Books : Job, Proverbs, and Ecclesiastes. New York: W.W. Norton, 2010. Print."
8 Raymond Huerta = "One interpretation is that God has planted in the human heart to love the world. It's more likely that the intended meaning is that man is aware of the idea of eternity, but he is incapable of understanding what "God maketh from the beginning to the end." Alter, Robert. "Ecclesiastes 3." The Wisdom Books : Job, Proverbs, and Ecclesiastes. New York: W.W. Norton, 2010. Print."
9 Raymond Huerta = "Ecclesiastes repeatedly urges us to enjoy life, but the author is aware that it is up to God to provide the time and/or means to enjoy the good things in life. For more examples of enjoying life in Ecclesiastes see:Ecclesiastes 2:24 Ecclesiastes 8:15 Ecclesiastes 9:9 Alter, Robert. "Ecclesiastes 3." The Wisdom Books : Job, Proverbs, and Ecclesiastes. New York: W.W. Norton, 2010. Print."
10 Raymond Huerta = "God is in complete control of everything and man should fear that fact of the universe. Alter, Robert. "Ecclesiastes 3." The Wisdom Books : Job, Proverbs, and Ecclesiastes. New York: W.W. Norton, 2010. Print."
11 Raymond Huerta = "This is an example in Ecclesiastes where the author rejects a fundamental premise of biblical doctrine. In the Creation story in Genesis 1, the human creature is brought into the world after the beasts to "have dominion" over all other living creatures. In the second Creation story in Genesis 2, the human is created first then all of the creatures after. God allows the human to name every creature, thus, establishing mans dominance over other creatures. See the two Creation stories here:Genesis 1:26 Genesis 2:19 Work cited: Alter, Robert. "Ecclesiastes 3." The Wisdom Books : Job, Proverbs, and Ecclesiastes. New York: W.W. Norton, 2010. Print."
12 Raymond Huerta = "This verse relates the reoccurring theme in Genesis of being made from dust and eventually returning to dust.See references to returning to the ground and dust here:Genesis 2:7 Genesis 3:23 Genesis 4:12 "
13 Raymond Huerta = "Who knoweth the spirit of man that goeth upward The author could be referring to the new doctrine beginning to gain traction in the Late Biblical period that imagines the ascent of the soul after death. the spirit of the beast that goeth downward to the earth?If the author is referring to the ascent of the soul, he is skeptical to the whole notion by suspecting that the spirit of man and beast alike descends into the earth (the Hebrew for earth can mean "underworld"). Alter, Robert. "Ecclesiastes 3." The Wisdom Books : Job, Proverbs, and Ecclesiastes. New York: W.W. Norton, 2010. Print."
14 Raymond Huerta = "The "after" of the question, which logically follows the previous verse, could refer to the fate of the departed spirit after death. The conclusion given is that one can never know what will happen after death, so the only reasonable thing to do is enjoy life in the present. Alter, Robert. "Ecclesiastes 3." The Wisdom Books : Job, Proverbs, and Ecclesiastes. New York: W.W. Norton, 2010. Print."