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1 O lord, thou hast searched me, and known me. 2 Thou knowest my downsitting and mine uprising, thou understandest my thought afar off. 3 Thou compassest my path and my lying down, and art acquainted with all my ways. 4 For there is not a word in my tongue, but, lo, O LORD, thou knowest it altogether. 5 Thou hast beset me behind and before, and laid thine hand upon me. 6 Such knowledge is too wonderful for me; it is high, I cannot attain unto it. 7 Whither shall I go from thy spirit? or whither shall I flee from thy presence? 8 If I ascend up into heaven, thou art there: if I make my bed in hell, behold, thou art there. 9 If I take the wings of the morning, and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea; 10 Even there shall thy hand lead me, and thy right hand shall hold me. 11 If I say, Surely the darkness shall cover me; even the night shall be light about me. 12 Yea, the darkness hideth not from thee; but the night shineth as the day: the darkness and the light are both alike to thee. 13 For thou hast possessed my reins: thou hast covered me in my mother's womb. 14 I will praise thee; for I am fearfully and wonderfully made: marvellous are thy works; and that my soul knoweth right well. 15 My substance was not hid from thee, when I was made in secret, and curiously wrought in the lowest parts of the earth. 16 Thine eyes did see my substance, yet being unperfect; and in thy book all my members were written, which in continuance were fashioned, when as yet there was none of them. 17 How precious also are thy thoughts unto me, O God! how great is the sum of them! 18 If I should count them, they are more in number than the sand: when I awake, I am still with thee. 19 Surely thou wilt slay the wicked, O God: depart from me therefore, ye bloody men. 20 For they speak against thee wickedly, and thine enemies take thy name in vain. 21 Do not I hate them, O LORD, that hate thee? and am not I grieved with those that rise up against thee? 22 I hate them with perfect hatred: I count them mine enemies. 23 Search me, O God, and know my heart: try me, and know my thoughts: 24 And see if there be any wicked way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting.

Table of Contents

Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
Chapter 7
Chapter 8
Chapter 9
Chapter 10
Chapter 11
Chapter 12
Chapter 13
Chapter 14
Chapter 15
Chapter 16
Chapter 17
Chapter 18
Chapter 19
Chapter 20
Chapter 21
Chapter 22
Chapter 23
Chapter 24
Chapter 25
Chapter 26
Chapter 27
Chapter 28
Chapter 29
Chapter 30
Chapter 31
Chapter 32
Chapter 33
Chapter 34
Chapter 35
Chapter 36
Chapter 37
Chapter 38
Chapter 39
Chapter 40
Chapter 41
Chapter 42
Chapter 43
Chapter 44
Chapter 45
Chapter 46
Chapter 47
Chapter 48
Chapter 49
Chapter 50
Chapter 51
Chapter 52
Chapter 53
Chapter 54
Chapter 55
Chapter 56
Chapter 57
Chapter 58
Chapter 59
Chapter 60
Chapter 61
Chapter 62
Chapter 63
Chapter 64
Chapter 65
Chapter 66
Chapter 67
Chapter 68
Chapter 69
Chapter 70
Chapter 71
Chapter 72
Chapter 73
Chapter 74
Chapter 75
Chapter 76
Chapter 77
Chapter 78
Chapter 79
Chapter 80
Chapter 81
Chapter 82
Chapter 83
Chapter 84
Chapter 85
Chapter 86
Chapter 87
Chapter 88
Chapter 89
Chapter 90
Chapter 91
Chapter 92
Chapter 93
Chapter 94
Chapter 95
Chapter 96
Chapter 97
Chapter 98
Chapter 99
Chapter 100
Chapter 101
Chapter 102
Chapter 103
Chapter 104
Chapter 105
Chapter 106
Chapter 107
Chapter 108
Chapter 109
Chapter 110
Chapter 111
Chapter 112
Chapter 113
Chapter 114
Chapter 115
Chapter 116
Chapter 117
Chapter 118
Chapter 119
Chapter 120
Chapter 121
Chapter 122
Chapter 123
Chapter 124
Chapter 125
Chapter 126
Chapter 127
Chapter 128
Chapter 129
Chapter 130
Chapter 131
Chapter 132
Chapter 133
Chapter 134
Chapter 135
Chapter 136
Chapter 137
Chapter 138
Chapter 139
Chapter 140
Chapter 141
Chapter 142
Chapter 143
Chapter 144
Chapter 145
Chapter 146
Chapter 147
Chapter 148
Chapter 149
Chapter 150

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1 Raymond Huerta = "This verse and poem as a whole is a meditation on God searching the knowledge of man's innermost thoughts, limitations of human knowledge, and on God's inescapable presence throughout the universe. Alter, Robert. "139." The Book of Psalms: A Translation with Commentary. New York: W.W. Norton, 2007. Print."
2 Cary W = "Thank you Lord for granting David such a vision of your penetrating presence in all aspects of our life.  Truely nothing is hidden from you, nor are we ever of neglect of your Fatherly attention."
3 Raymond Huerta = "The verb could also mean "besiege," "bring into straits," but the sense of shaping or fashioning like a potter seems more likely here. With this understanding, "...laid thine hand upon me" is not an act of punishment but rather a gesture of the potter.Alter, Robert. "139." The Book of Psalms: A Translation with Commentary. New York: W.W. Norton, 2007. Print."
4 Raymond Huerta = "Some interpreters have understood this as an indication of east and west. The Hebrew term for "morning" means "east," and "sea" can sometimes mean "west." However, the image in this line is more vividly mythological. The author imagines taking wing with the morning as it appears in the east, then dwelling with the sun on its westward path to "the ends of the sea." Alter, Robert. "139." The Book of Psalms: A Translation with Commentary. New York: W.W. Norton, 2007. Print."
5 Raymond Huerta = "The theme of being enveloped in darkness picks up the idea of residing down in Sheol, the underworld. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sheol"
6 Raymond Huerta = "By acting as though the night could be a light, this could serve instead of the illumination of daylight existence.Alter, Robert. "139." The Book of Psalms: A Translation with Commentary. New York: W.W. Norton, 2007. Print."
7 angela h = "God is present in the believers inner most parts. He gives us those "gut feelings" or prompting from the Holy Spirit when we are doing something we ought not or when we aren't doing something we should."
8 Raymond Huerta = "Often translated as "my innermost parts," the literal meaning of the Hebrew is "kidneys." Throughout the Bible the kidneys are thought of as the place of conscience, the context here (the parallel line, "hast covered me in my mother's womb) suggests that this case the term is a figure of speech for all the inner organs.Alter, Robert. "139." The Book of Psalms: A Translation with Commentary. New York: W.W. Norton, 2007. Print."
9 Raymond Huerta = "The location in the womb is associated with the idea of being enveloped in darkness expressed in verses 11 and 12."
10 Cary W = "As we enter into the inner chambers of our soul, the Spirit reveals the inner magnificent work of God in us, and that our soul knows and keeps in remembrance when our awareness forgets."
11 Raymond Huerta = "This phrase is appropriate for the speaker's reflection on his evolution in the womb from an unformed embryo to a particular human with consciousness. Alter, Robert. "139." The Book of Psalms: A Translation with Commentary. New York: W.W. Norton, 2007. Print."
12 Raymond Huerta = "The literal sense of the Hebrew phrase is "in the depths of the earth." With the movement from the enveloping darkness of the underworld to the womb earlier in the poem, there is an association between the womb and the depths.Alter, Robert. "139." The Book of Psalms: A Translation with Commentary. New York: W.W. Norton, 2007. Print."
13 Raymond Huerta = "This verse has themes of predestination. Predestination is the doctrine that God has all events in a persons life planned out. The line "...which in continuance were fashioned," might mean "the future days of the child to be born were already given shape in the womb." Alter, Robert. "139." The Book of Psalms: A Translation with Commentary. New York: W.W. Norton, 2007. Print.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Predestination"
14 Raymond Huerta = "The author could be imagining that after the long futile effort of attempting to count God's infinite thoughts, he will eventually fall asleep from exhaustion, and when he awakes he'll discover that God's eternal presence is still with him.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Predestination"
15 Raymond Huerta = "The name for God used here is 'eloah, which occurs only in poetry and is especially common in Job.Alter, Robert. "139." The Book of Psalms: A Translation with Commentary. New York: W.W. Norton, 2007. Print."
16 Raymond Huerta = "This verse is referencing the 10 Commandments.See Exodus 20:7 KJV"
17 Raymond Huerta = "Some scholars translate this as "those who despise you," in order to keep the continuity of the verse ("Do not I hate them" and "that hate thee"). "
18 Raymond Huerta = "The echo of verse 1 marks a closure through envelope structure."
19 Raymond Huerta = "Many modern interpretations say "know my heart," but the Hebrew says "my thoughts." However, because a different word is used from the one that occurs in verses 2 and 17, the translation that uses "mind" is most accurate. Alter, Robert. "139." The Book of Psalms: A Translation with Commentary. New York: W.W. Norton, 2007. Print."
20 Raymond Huerta = "Many understand this as "idolatrous," but the word for "idol" is 'etsev, whereas the form appearing here, 'otsev, would usually mean "pain," "sorrow," and "vexation." Thus, making this part of the verse mean that wayward thoughts are imagined to vex God.Alter, Robert. "139." The Book of Psalms: A Translation with Commentary. New York: W.W. Norton, 2007. Print."
21 Raymond Huerta = "The verb in verse 10 has an ambiguous sense, perhaps of entrapment, here at the end is wholly positive.Alter, Robert. "139." The Book of Psalms: A Translation with Commentary. New York: W.W. Norton, 2007. Print."