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1 The LORD is my light and my salvation; whom shall I fear? the LORD is the strength of my life; of whom shall I be afraid? 2 When the wicked, even mine enemies and my foes, came upon me to eat up my flesh, they stumbled and fell. 3 Though an host should encamp against me, my heart shall not fear: though war should rise against me, in this will I be confident. 4 One thing have I desired of the LORD, that will I seek after; that I may dwell in the house of the LORD all the days of my life, to behold the beauty of the LORD, and to enquire in his temple. 5 For in the time of trouble he shall hide me in his pavilion: in the secret of his tabernacle shall he hide me; he shall set me up upon a rock. 6 And now shall mine head be lifted up above mine enemies round about me: therefore will I offer in his tabernacle sacrifices of joy; I will sing, yea, I will sing praises unto the LORD. 7 Hear, O LORD, when I cry with my voice: have mercy also upon me, and answer me. 8 When thou saidst, Seek ye my face; my heart said unto thee, Thy face, LORD, will I seek. 9 Hide not thy face far from me; put not thy servant away in anger: thou hast been my help; leave me not, neither forsake me, O God of my salvation. 10 When my father and my mother forsake me, then the LORD will take me up. 11 Teach me thy way, O LORD, and lead me in a plain path, because of mine enemies. 12 Deliver me not over unto the will of mine enemies: for false witnesses are risen up against me, and such as breathe out cruelty. 13 I had fainted, unless I had believed to see the goodness of the LORD in the land of the living. 14 Wait on the LORD: be of good courage, and he shall strengthen thine heart: wait, I say, on the LORD.

Table of Contents

Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
Chapter 7
Chapter 8
Chapter 9
Chapter 10
Chapter 11
Chapter 12
Chapter 13
Chapter 14
Chapter 15
Chapter 16
Chapter 17
Chapter 18
Chapter 19
Chapter 20
Chapter 21
Chapter 22
Chapter 23
Chapter 24
Chapter 25
Chapter 26
Chapter 27
Chapter 28
Chapter 29
Chapter 30
Chapter 31
Chapter 32
Chapter 33
Chapter 34
Chapter 35
Chapter 36
Chapter 37
Chapter 38
Chapter 39
Chapter 40
Chapter 41
Chapter 42
Chapter 43
Chapter 44
Chapter 45
Chapter 46
Chapter 47
Chapter 48
Chapter 49
Chapter 50
Chapter 51
Chapter 52
Chapter 53
Chapter 54
Chapter 55
Chapter 56
Chapter 57
Chapter 58
Chapter 59
Chapter 60
Chapter 61
Chapter 62
Chapter 63
Chapter 64
Chapter 65
Chapter 66
Chapter 67
Chapter 68
Chapter 69
Chapter 70
Chapter 71
Chapter 72
Chapter 73
Chapter 74
Chapter 75
Chapter 76
Chapter 77
Chapter 78
Chapter 79
Chapter 80
Chapter 81
Chapter 82
Chapter 83
Chapter 84
Chapter 85
Chapter 86
Chapter 87
Chapter 88
Chapter 89
Chapter 90
Chapter 91
Chapter 92
Chapter 93
Chapter 94
Chapter 95
Chapter 96
Chapter 97
Chapter 98
Chapter 99
Chapter 100
Chapter 101
Chapter 102
Chapter 103
Chapter 104
Chapter 105
Chapter 106
Chapter 107
Chapter 108
Chapter 109
Chapter 110
Chapter 111
Chapter 112
Chapter 113
Chapter 114
Chapter 115
Chapter 116
Chapter 117
Chapter 118
Chapter 119
Chapter 120
Chapter 121
Chapter 122
Chapter 123
Chapter 124
Chapter 125
Chapter 126
Chapter 127
Chapter 128
Chapter 129
Chapter 130
Chapter 131
Chapter 132
Chapter 133
Chapter 134
Chapter 135
Chapter 136
Chapter 137
Chapter 138
Chapter 139
Chapter 140
Chapter 141
Chapter 142
Chapter 143
Chapter 144
Chapter 145
Chapter 146
Chapter 147
Chapter 148
Chapter 149
Chapter 150

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1 Raymond Huerta = "Throughout the psalm the author is in great distress, asking God to intervene on his behalf. The poem begins with a confident affirmation of God as the source of help under all grave threats. This theme is continued throughout verses 2 and 3, 5 and 6, and, most prominently, in verse 10. But this sense of trust, in a psalm does not prevent a feeling of fearful urgency in the author's plea to God (see verses 9 and 3). "
2 Raymond Huerta = "It's not clear if the verse is speaking literally in that armed enemies are out to kill him or whether this is a metaphor. Verse 12 leans towards the latter; the foe attempts to destroy him through shady judicial proceedings as opposed to physical violence. Alter, Robert. "27." The Book of Psalms: A Translation with Commentary. New York: W.W. Norton, 2007. Print."
3 Raymond Huerta = "At a glance this verse does not logically follow the preceding ones, the author expressed his confidence in God as his rescuer, however, now he declares that his most wanted desire is to spend all his time in the temple. The temple itself is repeatedly seen as a sanctuary in a political sense, this is the logical link between this verse and the next one. Alter, Robert. "27." The Book of Psalms: A Translation with Commentary. New York: W.W. Norton, 2007. Print."
4 Raymond Huerta = "The meaning of the verb baqer is still up for debate, but the noun biqoret, used in Leviticus 19:20 has a sense of "observation," suggesting it may mean here to take in with the eyes, to enjoy the sight of.Alter, Robert. "27." The Book of Psalms: A Translation with Commentary. New York: W.W. Norton, 2007. Print."
5 Raymond Huerta = "The two nouns used here are used in a metaphorical understatement as designations for a much more solid and imposing structure, as the third term in the sequence, "rock", suggests. Alter, Robert. "27." The Book of Psalms: A Translation with Commentary. New York: W.W. Norton, 2007. Print."
6 Raymond Huerta = "The use of "tent" (tabernacle) is metaphorically used to refer to the temple in Jerusalem. Alter, Robert. "27." The Book of Psalms: A Translation with Commentary. New York: W.W. Norton, 2007. Print."
7 Raymond Huerta = ""Face" means "presence." The author desperately seeks God's face (a privilege denied Moses, Exodus 30:18-23). The most practical meaning for God turning away His face would be abandoning the person to his enemies. "
8 Raymond Huerta = "In the event a mother's and father's love fail, God will be both mother and father to him in the most dire straits. "
9 Raymond Huerta = "The term shoreim, appears half a dozen times in Psalms and nowhere else in the Bible. It may be derived from the verbal root meaning "to watch." It plays on the more common word for "foes," tsorerim (or, as the next verse has, tsarim). Alter, Robert. "27." The Book of Psalms: A Translation with Commentary. New York: W.W. Norton, 2007. Print."
10 Raymond Huerta = "Nefesh, "life breath," shows a secondary meaning: the throat through which breath passes.Alter, Robert. "27." The Book of Psalms: A Translation with Commentary. New York: W.W. Norton, 2007. Print."
11 Raymond Huerta = "Whether the author is speaking to himself or to an individual member of his audience, this verse is a great summary of the psychology that informs this psalm. It started with affirming trust in God and repeats that hopeful confidence, but then trust has to be asserted against the terrors of being overwhelmed by enemies. Alter, Robert. "27." The Book of Psalms: A Translation with Commentary. New York: W.W. Norton, 2007. Print."