Researchers Probe Stereotype: Christians and Science Don't Get Along

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In my article on religion and intelligence, one thing that I came across related to stereotypes about Christians and science where in the US, they performed more poorly than their non-religious cohorts as a result of the stereotype.  They also are less likely to pursue science in education statistically speaking.  However, removing the stereotypes removed the bias for the Christians in the study that I cite in the article, which you can find here: https://drshellblog.wordpress.com/2015/12/22/intelligence-and-religiosity-schools-of-thought/ In addition and from a personal perspective, I’ve wondered if many religious people are being taught to fear science from some churches, in particular more fundamentalist belief systems, and doing them a disservice. I know quite a few strong biblically literal minded believers who have been taught in church that evolution equates with atheism, that science’s role is to disprove god, and the like, and none of which is true of course, but it sets a poor example and spreads misinformation, and maintaining the inadequate science literacy of an entire group of people. Interesting podcast that I rather enjoyed.

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1 Michelle King = "My apologies for writing my comment in the wrong location. I only now learned how to comment appropriately. In my article on religion and intelligence, one thing that I came across related to stereotypes about Christians and science where in the US, they performed more poorly than their non-religious cohorts as a result of the stereotype.  They also are less likely to pursue science in education statistically speaking.  However, removing the stereotypes removed the bias for the Christians in the study that I cite in the article, which you can find here: https://drshellblog.wordpress.com/2015/12/22/intelligence-and-religiosity-schools-of-thought/  In addition and from a personal perspective, I’ve wondered if many religious people are being taught to fear science from some churches, in particular more fundamentalist belief systems, and doing them a disservice. I know quite a few strong biblically literal minded believers who have been taught in church that evolution equates with atheism, that science’s role is to disprove god, and the like, and none of which is true of course, but it sets a poor example and spreads misinformation, and maintaining the inadequate science literacy of an entire group of people.  Interesting podcast that I rather enjoyed. "
2 Michael McKissick = "Thanks for sharing your article! While I can't speak for the Christian church as a whole, there's no denying that some view science as a threat. For some, I think the conflict arises because religion and science are both searching for truth, and if each school of thought does not explain the world in exact same terms, then one must be false. Your thoughts about fundamental believers reminds of a concept called "god of the gaps." This refers to how theists attribute gaps in knowledge to God. So if we don't know how gravity works, "God did it." The problem with this way of thinking is that as our gaps in knowledge shrink, so does God. On the subject, Dietrich Bonhoeffer said, "How wrong it is to use God as a stop-gap for the incompleteness of our knowledge. If in fact the frontiers of knowledge are being pushed further and further back (and that is bound to be the case), then God is being pushed back with them, and is therefore continually in retreat. We are to find God in what we know, not in what we don't know."I would hope that as our understanding of the world increases, believers will view the complexity and harmony of the universe as a sign of God's creative authority, as opposed to a threat to His existence. "
3 Michelle King = "I wish more believers had your attitude, I certainly found it refreshing. If there were less fear, there would likely be an improvement in science literacy, which from my perspective is a grave issue facing the United States and some other countries.  Science and science literacy promotes well being in societies. I wish many other religious folk would recognize that there is nothing to be concerned about with respect to understanding and accepting science.  It's a way of thinking, not what to think, and in no way represents a disproving of god or gods. Science is un-directed, the benefits are available to everyone. It is not to be worshiped, and the principles can be overturned if researchers can repeat a study revealing the opposite of what has been demonstrated.  Science offers transparent verifiable answers to questions. If a believer can see gods in science, I'm all for it. This philosophy may be some time in coming. "
4 James Williams = "I personally love science and understand that all science is just mans terminology to try and vocalize what god has already done. I have found that if you study science from an comparative perspective you will find that man is coming up with the conclusion that God was right all along ie. Proverbs 23:7King James Version (KJV)7 For as he thinketh in his heart, so is he"