About Sally Quinn

“When two people relate to each other authentically and humanly, God is the electricity that surges between them.”

I am an Army brat, brought up on Army posts all over the world where the closest thing to religion was the non-denominational chapel on whatever Army base we happened to be near. I announced to my parents when I was 13 that I was an atheist. And I was a committed atheist all of my life. My view was that more evil had been done in the name of religion than anything else in the world. I saw no redeeming value in it at all. Then I met Jon Meacham and we began talking.

No, Jon didn’t convert me, but he did convince me that religion was not a subject to be dismissed or disdained. I began reading and studying and talking to people about religion and spirituality with Jon as my guide. My reaction to what I learned was threefold. First, I was embarrassed that I had shrugged off a subject that was so important to so many people in the world, particularly since I was a reporter of politics and culture. Secondly, I was amazed at how fascinating and exciting the study of religion was — and the more I learned, the more immersed in it I became. Third, I was moved by the yearning for something beyond oneself that drew so many people, even the doubters, to search for faith, especially after 9/11.

When I began talking about religion to people in Washington, normally a very cynical town, I was surprised at how interested they were and how much they wanted to talk about it. It was that continued fascination with the subject that led me and Jon to this conversation online.

I don’t have any idea who or what God is. But the closest explanation I’ve heard that makes sense to me is one of my favorite quotes from Martin Buber, the great theologian. “When two people relate to each other authentically and humanly, God is the electricity that surges between them.”

I still don’t know what to call myself. Years ago I went to the opening of “How To Succeed in Business without Really Trying” on Broadway. There was a moment when the star, Robert Morse, sang to himself in the mirror, “You have the cool clear eyes of a seeker of wisdom and truth.” That sounds good to me.

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  • morgan-lynn lamberth

    As with so many atheists, you seem shallow in not knowing why one should be an atheist other than the harm of some religious people. Do read Dawkins’s book and “T he Transcendent Temptation” for starters .Read other books put out by Prometheus. On the web check out Theology Web and a Christian and an Atheist for forums where theists and non-theists debate . Also check out Talk Reason for essays on the fallacies of theisitic arguments. Be an educated atheist! Both the Post and Newsweek should have an article on Dr. Paul Kurtz,Mr. Secular Progressive himself. Thanks. You look what a woman of your age should look as Steinem would say!

  • anu singh

    sally quionn’s website , please ?

  • John Thau

    Sally and Jon thank you for help in champion this discussion. If one is concerned about humanity and has “the truth” then it seems like a logical social obligation for the truth to be shared appropriately. (Usually in word and deed to the chosen ones.) Most organized religions have done this in the past and still do it more or less. ( Some religions got worked over by the printing press and a literate populace. So called facts and truths got challenged. Some truths didn’t hold up and the religon’s credibility was tarnished. For “People of Faith” that I have met the faith is reinforced by the events of every moment they live.) That act of sharing the truth should recognize the non elighten (so to speak) may not believe or accept the shared truths. (Its sort of hard to have and be in the lifeboat and no one else wants to come aboard as the ship is sinking! It does happen.) As in the universe/nature you might expect the/a spiritual leadership to be recognized and followed because of its/their simplicity and power for all to understand without language or cultural barriers. (Show and do or by example.) (Example providing/receiving clothing, food, shelter, cures or experiencing disease, accidents, earthquakes, floods and fires communicate without having to convey in English, Persian, Chinese etc.) My personal take is if you live long enough the truth will become self evident. Its nice to accelerate the learning curve with coaches and instructors. Accelerated learning helps us study and develop more insight truths/facts and find and help solve/work new survival problems/situations. Last as we know, teams work better in the long run than loners, hence organized religions last longer than individuals and that’s only important if one cares beyond themselves.

  • Ilana

    Why not mention that Buber was a great JEWISH theologian?

  • Marlin Ristenbatt

    I’m about 1/4 thru Dawkins'”The God Delusion”. He directly presents the case that humankind’s sustained efforts to learn bring us to the point that evolution has produced an organism that not only has immenselly succeeded materially, but also has from the outset of humanity bought into an external sentient force, which Western societies call God. He now proposes that we have learned enough to leave behind the “generated in the brain” concept of a personal God–a convincing case indeed! Daniel Dennett, Sam Harris and others make the same case. In all the discussions I’ve ever encountered I have never seen a discussion of the “cottage industry” nature of religion. Perhaps including an analysis of this aspect would be helpful. For example, almost all congregations have the nature of a small industry which requires marketting, continual enlistment of new members, and contiual reenforcement of the core beliefs. I’m excited about the new discussion group.

  • Fellow Seeker

    I also highly recommend any writings by C.S. Lewis, once an atheist himself.

  • Imatoski

    Sally, Thanks for the nice post, it seems to be written with honesty from your heart. The man I would recommend reading is the brilliant and gentle Carl Sagan. Soon after his book was published, “Shadows of Our Ancient Ancestors”, Carl appeared on the political show “The McLaughlin Report”. John McLaughlin just couldn’t wait to ask Carl if he believed in God. Carl responded as only Carl can: “Let’s just say I am a searcher with high standards of evidence”. From the same book, Sagan is also quoted, when referring to God and religion: “in the long run, you are far better off to face the harsh realities then two embrace a reassuring fable.”Make no mistake, Carl Sagan WAS an atheist, he was just a kinder gentler version than Dawkins, but nevertheless held precisely the same view of God.At this point, you simply need to ask yourself, whom do I believe, Jon Meacham or Carl Sagan?

  • Thomas N. Tibbatts

    After seeing Sally Quinn’s interview with Ann Curry on the Today show this morning I hurried to read more about her on the Newsweek.com web page.IGod Bless,

  • Gary Meyers

    Sally, your comments this morning on the Today Show were so true. We must understand the religion of the people before policy can be made. There are so many religions that this task can be daunting. Our efforts in Iraq and Afghanistan will never be successful if the religious motivations are not embraced. Please elaborate your discussion about Islamic beliefs when you can. Since it is a growing religion in America it seems highly relevant and important to better understand. Thank you,

  • Tom Russell

    We have all seen the videos of the terrorists training their children to fight in the masks with guns ready and now we see in America the Christian kids training in blackface and chanting. We have allowed the unbridled religious factions to set in motion their revelations with the next generation. Conversation? It’s too late.

  • Jeannie Carter

    Dear Sally –

  • Jim W. Hensley

    As long as God is only a small part of our life, then religion is meaningless. God allows us to make our own decisions, but if our life is not centered upon Him, then everything else will be off-center.

  • A. Believer

    Not only atheists, but also spiritual folks, have often used the rational that there must not be a God, or at least the “God” presented by religion, because of all the wars in the name of religion (or God). And of course, “what about all the pain and suffering in the world?”A couple thoughts though: 1) Let’s all agree that for just a moment that there is no God and no religion. I get the sneaking suspicion that an atheist or folks that are spiritual but without a specific religious affiliation believe that all wars, pain and suffering would magically disappear. I don’t believe it would and that it would be even worse. That’s not to say that religion is a crutch…but rather it is the answer, and not the question. 2) What we hear about religion is often like watching the nightly news…we hear the aberrations (the bad stuff), but rarely hear the good stuff (though it was nice to hear in this morning’s news story that Christians are leading the effort in Darfur – but how often do we hear about that – no…we hear about sex scandals, etc. 3) Remember, we live in a “fallen” world. What does that mean? That none of us are perfect and none have God’s full truth. Those of us that try to live godly lives will stumble and perhaps look ridiculous some (or much) of the time, but we do try. And then there are those that never try, but are quick to point out the hypocrisy of those that do – a convenient position to be in. 4) Unfortunately, I am sad to say that not enough leaders in the church (or at least those trotted out for the news or talk shows), reflect much in the way of humility – which results in a lack of humility from church-goers as well.5) I suggest reading just about anything by C.S. Lewis – but start with “Mere Christianity.”

  • A. Believer

    Not only atheists, but also spiritual folks, have often used the rational that there must not be a God, or at least the “God” presented by religion, because of all the wars in the name of religion (or God). And of course, “what about all the pain and suffering in the world?”A couple thoughts though: 1) Let’s all agree that for just a moment that there is no God and no religion. I get the sneaking suspicion that an atheist or folks that are spiritual but without a specific religious affiliation believe that all wars, pain and suffering would magically disappear. I don’t believe it would and that it would be even worse. That’s not to say that religion is a crutch…but rather it is the answer, and not the question. 2) What we hear about religion is often like watching the nightly news…we hear the aberrations (the bad stuff), but rarely hear the good stuff (though it was nice to hear in this morning’s news story that Christians are leading the effort in Darfur – but how often do we hear about that – no…we hear about sex scandals, etc. 3) Remember, we live in a “fallen” world. What does that mean? That none of us are perfect and none have God’s full truth. Those of us that try to live godly lives will stumble and perhaps look ridiculous some (or much) of the time, but we do try. And then there are those that never try, but are quick to point out the hypocrisy of those that do – a convenient position to be in. 4) Unfortunately, I am sad to say that not enough leaders in the church (or at least those trotted out for the news or talk shows), reflect much in the way of humility – which results in a lack of humility from church-goers as well.5) I suggest reading just about anything by C.S. Lewis – but start with “Mere Christianity.”

  • a kakar

    Here is what Richard Dawkins (2006-The God Delusion” says:2. From a treaty drafted in 1796 under Washington and signed by Adam in 1797 “…USA is not, in any sense founded on the Christian religion…”And I agree anyone who invokes Judeo-christian books as facts needs help in his psyche

  • Patrick M. McKenna

    Leaders from the media, government, and churches who insist on injecting religion into government should be publicly challenged to submit voluntarily to public polygraphs (make it a TV show)to demonstrate that they truly believe what they profess to the public. My bet is few would pass.

  • BeachWoman

    Sally, I saw you and Jon on Hardball this evening and had to check out this website. Since I am in search of information on what all others believe this is a perfect place for me to blog. Be careful in your search for what you believe in of people that are teaching inorder to convert. As I look at my search as a personal choice I am put off by others to with all good intentions try to convert me to believing much more than what I am able to understand. Many years ago in my search I had a good Jewish friend that said to me “people believe in GOD because they are afraid NOT to”. I am very impressed that he made that comment along with his offer to teach me what the Jewish religion was all about. That said to me that he had no personal interest in converting me to his religion. No he did not convert me but gave me much to think about. I too felt alone during the 9/11 situation, however, I realized that feeling had nothing to do with my religious beliefs. I found no religion or belief system that gave me any answers to that experience. I did find that helping and being kind to others made me feel less alone. I have decided that in doing that brought me to the point where I believe there is “maybe” a power greater than myself out there somewhere. I have been fortunate that for the last 20 years I have had the 12 Steps of AA to follow as some do the 10 Commandments. It does give me a guide for living which I do feel everyone needs. As far as GOD I am still searching.Thanks to you and Jon for this forum.

  • Parker

    Ms. Quinn: I respect your resume, ability to move within the circles of Washington DC, and your interest in seeking wisdom and truth. I have to say that your introductory article makes you sound naive and uninformed with respect to seeking a higher truth and I find it hard to take you ‘seriously’ especially as a writer of your experience.I hope you keep at your quest to figure out what to call yourself because it is important to the future of humanity and to US policy. After all, too many 11 year old children are dying of leukemia because a President will not support stem cell research from the Christian belief that ‘life’ begins at the ‘moment of conception’.

  • Real

    Sally is either “believing in God” for career reasons. Since President Bush entered office there has been a constant attack on the media as being anti-religion, liberal, anti-American etc. Or she is “believing in God” because she is getting old. When people realize that their time is almost up they reach out like this.

  • Anglican

    PS Yes, there are Episcopalians/Anglcans I disagree with too.

  • Parker

    Anglican, Thank you for your interpretation of Ecclesiastes 11:5. Unfortunately it is not the dominant view of the Christian right (those names you state) who seems to control the debate about federal funds for stem cell research, as a start.You seem able to think critically with respect to passages in the Bible. Do you also read views that clearly do not fit your view of God, faith and religion? For example, do you read Dawkins or Harris with an open mind?I’ve read Karen Armstrong, Jack Miles and others (like Wills) who are more unabashedly Christian and have found nuggets of thought that have added to my understanding. Writers like Sam Harris have sharpened the debate about God and religion considerably, however. Saying ‘some Christians, some Muslims, etc. tar the group’, what I call the ‘most of us aren’t like them’ argument, gives me no comfort that the inherent incompatibility between the religions won’t lead to the destruction of the world. I doubt you’d be the sort of Christian that causes me concern directly, but I cannot say that about your closely related extremists who openly look forward to the ‘final battle’ in Revelations.It is why I reject completely any and all religion and therefore, belief in God as described therein. I reject completely that Jesus is the son of God and that the Bible is the infallable word of God. I reject completely that the Koran is the word of God as communicated through his prophet Mohammed. If I could make just one wish for humanity it would be that reason and intellectual honesty replace religion and faith. There are much better options than religion as I am discovering that involve all the freedom that comes with peace of mind and none of the fears that may come from finally rejecting a belief system that tells you you will either burn in hell for all eternity or be killed for apostacy…quite liberating!

  • Fool For The Lord

    Dear Parker,I’m a believer of Anglican’s kind, I suspect, although what can I tell from a web-post? Anway, my belief is my business, and I couldn’t begin to explain it in a web-post. The explanation, and the belief, will change tomorrow anyway. Individual’s faith and doubts are always shifting, I believe. “Religious fundamentalists” are frustrating to you, I suspect, at least partly because they seem so strident and confident in their views, almost like they learned them by rote and can brook no compromise lest their heads explode. But Harris and Dawkins can be frustrating too, for parallel reasons. The idea that a world free of religion could easily be organized along lines of rational thought and action is fanciful, don’t you think? Most of the killing and evil of the last 100 years was done in the name of rational, atheistic belief systems. I know Harris puts Nazism and Communism under the “faith” category, but this seems to be a little tricky to me. If nothing else, Communism was a well thought-out and methodical doctrine. I’m sure that Pol Pot believed he was being quite rational in killing all members of the Camobodian bourgoisie to purge the country of “incorrect” habits and traditions. Human beings are very capable of thinking up structured systems of evil and death quite apart from those inspired by their view of the divine. And finally, as a someone who does believe in a God that I believe expects something of me, it is slightly irritating to see people of faith straw-manned by non-believers. I’m guessing you don’t actually know any religious believers really well, in the sense that you really know what they believe, why they believe it, what their doubts are, and how they live their faith, etc. Do you personally know enough Christians to be confident the dominant Christian view is that life begins at conception. I mean, do you? Or is it just a teensy bit more satisfing to project such a belief on all Christians so that you can knock it down. Personally, I’ve only ever really discussed faith with my wife in any substantial way, and I only understand about 10% of what she thinks, after 15 years of marriage. I’m guessing you don’t really know anyone any better. If you are interested in drawing rational conclusions about other people’s faith, then you should get some real experience and insight, not just react to the latest TV soundbite from some TV fundementalist. But maybe I’m being unkind and uninformed. I don’t know you either, after all. My point is that “rational inquiry” is not always very rational or fact-laden. I’ve often produced some of my most stupid thinking when trying to be rational. As this post may well suggest. Anyway, good luck to you.

  • Ted Swart

    To Sally Quinn and Jon Meacham:I have tried in vain to reach you by email so I am resorting to a comment on both your pane list contributions. I think the whole notion of having a forum discussing the issue of faith in a frank and searching manner is a good one and many – though not all – of the panellists have risen to the occasion and many of the comments have been excellent. As I see it an enormous amount of commentary has already been generated and making any kind of sense out of it is a non-trivial exercise. Nevertheless it would be shame if the whole exercise simply sank away in to the sand. So I was wondering if the two of you were planning some sort of follow up exercise.For my part, the one thing which stands out like a sore thumb is the incompatibility between the worlds monotheistic religions — given their mutually exclusive claims. Atheists and agnostics take this as read but believers, in one or other of the monotheistic faiths, seem to be able – in some strange way — to avoid facing up to this. Anyway, I am sure that I am not alone in hoping the two of you will give the rest of us some idea as to what you have in mind once the forum closes down. Maybe if you did this some of the rather crude comments – of which there are fortunately not too many – might be less frequent. Try as I might I have been unable to find – on the website – any indication of how the threads will be pulled together.

  • Joanna Hanes-Lahr

    On Faith is at last a thoughtful approach to open dialogue about a little understood “third-rail” subject on which many base their entire lives. Your panelists are gracious to share their knowledge so freely. May I suggest one other addition to the panel, known to many fellow panelists: Thomas J.J. Altizer, now professor of English at SUNY Stoney Brook. He received his Ph.D at the University of Chicago in 1955 with a dissertation on Greek and Eastern religious philosophy. He was teaching Bible and Religion at Emory University when his “death of God” theology became a heated debate. He’s been at the State University of New York since 1968 and observes that American theology is in the process of transition. The emergence of radical theology replaces the older forms of faith, in which the traditional faith is passing and has no relevance to the present. The revolution of radical theology reverses the old forms of theology that is based on the God of Christian tradition. For Altizer, the task of theology must abandon the theology created by Christendom and embrace the dawn of radical theology that proclaims the good news of the “death of God.” I think he would add a great deal to your panel.

  • Mark Hunter

    It is time for people to grow up and realize that God and Good and Evil is not something “out there” but within each and every one of us. The Scientific Revolution was the first step toward a more humanist world. It taught mankind that the forces of Nature were explainable and not caused by unseen gods. Then came Freud, who showed us that God is in ourselves.Everything we see, hear, touch, taste, and smell takes place between our ears. Even our perception of God takes place within our brains. Religion has us project these perceptions outside of ourselves, creating an amorphous, spiritual world beyond our physical being; a world impossible to explain or prove exists.As long as we practice religion, we surrender responsibility for our lives and the life of Earth. We must enter a new era of responsibility. Only we can solve the problems that face us. There is nothing “out there” that can or will help us.

  • Kenneth L. Evans

    It would help this problem if you and Mr. Meachem would getYou can get a copy only on line at http://www.publishamerica.com.Cordially,

  • Dennis Ferguson

    The Great QuestIt is silly to be a believer or non-believer. We simply do-not-know!

  • Mark Hunter

    Excuse me Dr. Evans. Are you addressing me? If so, to what “problem” are you referring?

  • William T. Ward

    If you want the truth, go to the source.Long story short.I have no gift to give you but to say…GO TO THE SOURCE!!!May you experiance be fulfilling.

  • Mark Hunter

    Dr. Evans:Please disregard my last post.

  • james whalen

    Dear Sally Quinn:What a lovely Irish name!Sincerely,James Whaen

  • John Donovan

    Dear Sally Quinn, The pope needs to make the consecration of Russia to Immaculate Heart of Mary. Our Lady appear to 3 children in 1917 at Fatima, Portugal and ask that Russia be consecrated to her Immaculate Heart. Past popes have done this including Pope John Paul 2. None of the popes have done what Our Lady ask. The pope needs to make the consecration in union with all the bishops throughout the world and mention Russia. None of the popes have done this. Our Lady said that Russia will spread its errors across the world and many people will die. Sincerely, John Donovan

  • Anne Newman

    Ms. Quinn,I’m glad I stumbled upon the On Faith website. Newsweek is a personal favorite and I very much admire Jon Meacham’s writing and his television work. Your books are now on my list of “things I want to read,” as you sound like a very interesting person. I have always been fascinated with different religions and the nature of faith. Have you ever considered Unitarian Universalism? (www.uua.org is a good place to start.) You won’t necessarily find answers there, but it’s a safe place to ask questions. Best wishes to you on your spiritual journey, wherever it might lead.

  • Jim Carr

    John Donovan,I’ve been a life-long Catholic. All eight of my great-grandparents came from Ireland ( save one from Germany ). However, when someone focuses on the ethnic aspect of their religion I haven’t heard the kind of talk that appeared in your e-mail (i.e., ” Protestants and other pagans. ” ) in over forty years.It has long been my impression, and would certainly be my hope and prayer, that most genuinely sincere Catholics have long since embraced the teaching of the 2nd Vatican Council from back in the early 1960’s, that urged us to respect all those who sincerely follow the gospel ( or, for that matter, who sincerely seek to do God’s will ), even though they might not be fully united with us in all matters of doctrine which we hold to be sacred and In the spirit of friendly, civil diologue that is the goal of this web-site, I want to believe that your remarks were ” tongue in cheek ” rather than intentionally disrespectful toward our seperated brothers and sisters in Christ.May God bless you, John Donovan, as well as all who participate in this diologue in a spirit of peace and good will toward all.Oh!, and by the way, I pray the daily office

  • jim carr

    John Donovan, please accept my apologies. I have just realized that my comments should have been in response to James Whalen’s post, and not to yours.However, my prayer for God’s blessings upon you and yours still holds. And now, James Whalen, I specifically ask for God’s blessings upon you and yours as well. Your brother in Christ, Jim

  • Madeleine Mysko

    Dear Ms. Quinn,Thank you for writing what you remember about the suffering of those wounded in war. Such remembering–the honesty in the specifics–is heroic. I am a former Army nurse who served at Brooke Army Medical Center in 1969 on the burn ward. For years I suppressed my memories of the suffering I witnessed. I went on with my life, married and raised my children, became a nurse-writer, writing poems and stories about “real life,” but managing to write only one poem about the burn ward. Recently, in my despair over the present war, I wrote an essay that first appeared in the excellent on-Line peace journal, Raving Dove, and later was picked up as an OpEd piece by the Baltimore Sun. I was afraid of hurting people, by telling what I remembered. But the outpouring of emails I received in response has reassured me. I now will go on and write more. I feel I have a moral responsibility to bear witness, especially as I have been given gifts that allow me to write. We must not turn our faces away. Peace to you and your loved ones,

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  • Pastor Ricardo Turner

    Hello Ms. Quinn,

  • Pat Livingston

    Dear Sally Quinn -My mother-in-law sent me your article from the Jan. 10 Hartford Courant (first written for the Washington Post)”Squander No More U.S. Lives in Iraq.” I was deeply moved by your story and your plea. I was horrified at your experience in the hosptital (which I remember) and on that terrible plane ride with the wounded and dying.That you are now using that experience to raise such an authentic and powerful voice for “the least imnmoral choice” in Iraq strikes me as redemptive.I have two sons – one who was in the Desert Storm Gulf War (now a nurse as a result of the dreadful things he saw – wanting to work for healing) and the other is in the Active Reserves – so far not sent to war.I pray, with you, that some way can be found to end this carnage. Thank you for what you are doing to influence that.Pat Livingston

  • His Grace is Enough

    Sally,

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  • Bruce

    >> I’m about 1/4 thru Dawkins “The God Delusion.” He directly presents the case that humankind’s sustained efforts to learn bring us to the point that evolution has produced an organism that not only has immensely succeeded materially, but also has from the outset of humanity bought into an external sentient force, which Western societies call God. He now proposes that we have learned enough to leave behind the “generated in the brain” concept of a personal God–a convincing case indeed! Daniel Dennett, Sam Harris and others make the same case. << When, in a debate, one of Richard Dawkins' associates was asked: "What if man inherently understanding that God exists is the normal state of being, and Atheism — is the aberrant, "meme," (evolved in the brain) you speak of? She was unable to counter, and the crowd errupted in applause.

  • CRAIG CLAYTON

    No matter how hard you tried you could not eliminate the effect your biographical note has on a person of faith. You come across as patronizing and wiser-than-thou. No person of faith will trust you, based solely on that note.

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  • Allison Decker

    My mother was a seeker. She rested her search and her soul in Christianity. I have come to appreciate the faith she held and the hope it brought her – and can/does bring all of us, especially in times of duress. However, I can not embrace a ultimate being that is pressed upon me by social sway. Spirituality, to me, is much deeper than people claiming THEY have THE truth – that they, alone, hold the key of knowledge that leads all seekers to God. I believe in God, but like Sally, I can’t espouse who/what God is and join the ranks of the religious evangelicals who push their beliefs upon others.

  • anne O’Mara

    I hope that as Sally Quinn and Jon Meachem continue their discussion about religion and science and atheism, calling attention to atheist Dawkins, they will balance the discussion with the thoughts of one known as a truly great contemporary philospher: the author of a book called “Faith and Reason” (JPII)If some of the truly great thinkers of the Catholic faith could discuss and debate with Dawkins, I think the public would clearly see how pitiable is Mr Dawkins’ bitter, angry and confused thinking. To me, his description of the God of the old testament is very revealing of his own emotional spiritual struggles, but not very edifying about God.

  • anne O’Mara

    I hope that as Sally Quinn and Jon Meachem continue their discussion about religion and science and atheism, calling attention to atheist Dawkins, they will balance the discussion with the thoughts of one known as a truly great contemporary philospher: the author of a book called “Faith and Reason” (JPII)If some of the truly great thinkers of the Catholic faith could discuss and debate with Dawkins, I think the public would clearly see how pitiable is Mr Dawkins’ bitter, angry and confused thinking. To me, his description of the God of the old testament is very revealing of his own emotional spiritual struggles, but not very edifying about God.

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    Not much on my mind lately, but that’s how it is. My life’s been dull these days, but such is life. I haven’t been up to much recently.

  • doug mcdaniel

    God is merely a personal projection to explain a universe reinforced by group-thinkers of a similar ilk. A simplistic explanation of causality which simply happened. D Ripley McDaniel, evolutionary-psychologist, Georgetown University, Catholic U. MA,PhD Washington DC

  • doug mcdaniel

    God is merely a personal projection to explain a universe reinforced by group-thinkers of a similar ilk. A simplistic explanation of causality which simply happened. D Ripley McDaniel, evolutionary-psychologist, Georgetown University, Catholic U. MA,PhD Washington DC

  • Doug McDaniel,psychologist

    What a cross-cultural phenemona,The ideological simplicity of the religious perception of the ways of the universe. It is a positive testimony to the humility of humankind that it was was created by some super-person promising life eternal, Indeed like a soothing band-aid applied to sentient creatures keenly aware of their own mortaity. Hopefully having created god(s),we will recognize our “soul” as the evolutionaly by-product requisite for self-perception and feedback in the struggle for survival and develop beyond the moot and logic-tight myopia of a deceptive religious realities and accept the fact we have inherited from an amoral universe a fractured social bonding mechanism intrinsic to most living creatures.

  • Doug McDaniel,psychologist

    What a cross-cultural phenemona,The ideological simplicity of the religious perception of the ways of the universe. It is a positive testimony to the humility of humankind that it was was created by some super-person promising life eternal, Indeed like a soothing band-aid applied to sentient creatures keenly aware of their own mortaity. Hopefully having created god(s),we will recognize our “soul” as the evolutionaly by-product requisite for self-perception and feedback in the struggle for survival and develop beyond the moot and logic-tight myopia of a deceptive religious realities and accept the fact we have inherited from an amoral universe a fractured social bonding mechanism intrinsic to most living creatures.

  • Doug McDaniel,psychologist

    What a cross-cultural phenemona,The ideological simplicity of the religious perception of the ways of the universe. It is a positive testimony to the humility of humankind that it was was created by some super-person promising life eternal, Indeed like a soothing band-aid applied to sentient creatures keenly aware of their own mortaity. Hopefully having created god(s),we will recognize our “soul” as the evolutionaly by-product requisite for self-perception and feedback in the struggle for survival and develop beyond the moot and logic-tight myopia of a deceptive religious realities and accept the fact we have inherited from an amoral universe a fractured social bonding mechanism intrinsic to most living creatures.

  • Doug McDaniel,psychologist

    What a cross-cultural phenemona,The ideological simplicity of the religious perception of the ways of the universe. It is a positive testimony to the humility of humankind that it was was created by some super-person promising life eternal, Indeed like a soothing band-aid applied to sentient creatures keenly aware of their own mortaity. Hopefully having created god(s),we will recognize our “soul” as the evolutionaly by-product requisite for self-perception and feedback in the struggle for survival and develop beyond the moot and logic-tight myopia of a deceptive religious realities and accept the fact we have inherited from an amoral universe a fractured social bonding mechanism intrinsic to most living creatures.

  • Doug McDaniel,psychologist

    What a cross-cultural phenemona,The ideological simplicity of the religious perception of the ways of the universe. It is a positive testimony to the humility of humankind that it was was created by some super-person promising life eternal, Indeed like a soothing band-aid applied to sentient creatures keenly aware of their own mortaity. Hopefully having created god(s),we will recognize our “soul” as the evolutionaly by-product requisite for self-perception and feedback in the struggle for survival and develop beyond the moot and logic-tight myopia of a deceptive religious realities and accept the fact we have inherited from an amoral universe a fractured social bonding mechanism intrinsic to most living creatures.

  • Doug McDaniel,psychologist

    What a cross-cultural phenemona,The ideological simplicity of the religious perception of the ways of the universe. It is a positive testimony to the humility of humankind that it was was created by some super-person promising life eternal, Indeed like a soothing band-aid applied to sentient creatures keenly aware of their own mortaity. Hopefully having created god(s),we will recognize our “soul” as the evolutionaly by-product requisite for self-perception and feedback in the struggle for survival and develop beyond the moot and logic-tight myopia of a deceptive religious realities and accept the fact we have inherited from an amoral universe a fractured social bonding mechanism intrinsic to most living creatures.

  • Doug McDaniel,psychologist

    What a cross-cultural phenemona,The ideological simplicity of the religious perception of the ways of the universe. It is a positive testimony to the humility of humankind that it was was created by some super-person promising life eternal, Indeed like a soothing band-aid applied to sentient creatures keenly aware of their own mortaity. Hopefully having created god(s),we will recognize our “soul” as the evolutionaly by-product requisite for self-perception and feedback in the struggle for survival and develop beyond the moot and logic-tight myopia of a deceptive religious realities and accept the fact we have inherited from an amoral universe a fractured social bonding mechanism intrinsic to most living creatures.

  • Doug McDaniel,psychologist

    What a cross-cultural phenemona,The ideological simplicity of the religious perception of the ways of the universe. It is a positive testimony to the humility of humankind that it was was created by some super-person promising life eternal, Indeed like a soothing band-aid applied to sentient creatures keenly aware of their own mortaity. Hopefully having created god(s),we will recognize our “soul” as the evolutionaly by-product requisite for self-perception and feedback in the struggle for survival and develop beyond the moot and logic-tight myopia of a deceptive religious realities and accept the fact we have inherited from an amoral universe a fractured social bonding mechanism intrinsic to most living creatures.

  • Doug McDaniel,psychologist

    What a cross-cultural phenemona,The ideological simplicity of the religious perception of the ways of the universe. It is a positive testimony to the humility of humankind that it was was created by some super-person promising life eternal, Indeed like a soothing band-aid applied to sentient creatures keenly aware of their own mortaity. Hopefully having created god(s),we will recognize our “soul” as the evolutionaly by-product requisite for self-perception and feedback in the struggle for survival and develop beyond the moot and logic-tight myopia of a deceptive religious realities and accept the fact we have inherited from an amoral universe a fractured social bonding mechanism intrinsic to most living creatures.

  • Doug McDaniel,psychologist

    What a cross-cultural phenemona,The ideological simplicity of the religious perception of the ways of the universe. It is a positive testimony to the humility of humankind that it was was created by some super-person promising life eternal, Indeed like a soothing band-aid applied to sentient creatures keenly aware of their own mortaity. Hopefully having created god(s),we will recognize our “soul” as the evolutionaly by-product requisite for self-perception and feedback in the struggle for survival and develop beyond the moot and logic-tight myopia of a deceptive religious realities and accept the fact we have inherited from an amoral universe a fractured social bonding mechanism intrinsic to most living creatures.

  • Doug McDaniel,psychologist

    What a cross-cultural phenemona,The ideological simplicity of the religious perception of the ways of the universe. It is a positive testimony to the humility of humankind that it was was created by some super-person promising life eternal, Indeed like a soothing band-aid applied to sentient creatures keenly aware of their own mortaity. Hopefully having created god(s),we will recognize our “soul” as the evolutionaly by-product requisite for self-perception and feedback in the struggle for survival and develop beyond the moot and logic-tight myopia of a deceptive religious realities and accept the fact we have inherited from an amoral universe a fractured social bonding mechanism intrinsic to most living creatures.

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  • Kathryn Warren

    Sally, I was struck by your comment “I don’t know who or what God is…”. I relate to this in so many ways even thought I was raised in the Southern Baptist faith. When I was 4, my father left my mother for another woman. When I was 10, my mother married a man (whom she insisted I call “Daddy”) and who sexually molested me for 2 years (ages 11 & 12). The term “Father” does not have a nice “ring” to me and I have had a problem of accepting God as my “Heavenly Father”. I am 53 years old and still struggle with some religious terminology. However, having said all that, I am deeply spiritual and have a profound faith that God IS in charge and I am personally blessed in my life now. I am glad to turn over problems to Him when I know there are times I am not capable of solving them alone. Did all that make sense? I am suspicious of those who have “blind faith”…we should always search for the truth and understanding we know we must have to survive. It’s ok to questions religion, just not to question God’s motives. They are beyond all our understanding as the frail humans we are. As “children”, we can only try to serve Him as best we can. Thank you for your candidness.

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    Parents have no right in spanking you – Or do they? That could be another persuasive speech topic

  • Joseph Williams

    Greetings Sally,

  • Steve Harmon

    Your comments on ABC News showed you to be out of touch. Unless your comments were edited beyond recognition…you look like an out of touch snob. The point of religion is all within ABC news and a few inside political jokers. National TV leading with Mitt..that is a bad thing? Ron Allen ABC news kicking Mitt around..thats not news.. When was the last time you hung out with regular people?Steve

  • Steve Harmon

    Your comments on ABC News showed you to be out of touch. Unless your comments were edited beyond recognition…you look like an out of touch snob. The point of religion is all within ABC news and a few inside political jokers. National TV leading with Mitt..that is a bad thing..Ron Allen ABC news kicking Mitt around..thats not news.. When was the last time you hung out with regular people?Steve

  • Joe Erwin

    So, according to Mitt Romney, those who profess faith in God are entitled to freedom, and he welcomes their support. He seems to have openly declared that he does not support freedom for those who do not profess faith in God. Where does this leave those of us who are agnostic or atheist because we find the concept of God unbelievable?

  • Herb Stahlke

    Sally,I watched the Romney religion speech this morning on MSNBC and the discussion afterwards. Your remarks on how Romney had simply excluded all Americans who do not have religious convictions, especially Christian convictions, were the most thoughtful of the group. I also noticed that Matthews almost cut you off and that the whole panel not only ignored you completely but changed the subject back to the “America is a religious country” theme. As a Lutheran, one of those whom Romney mentioned favorably, I am appalled at this rush to embrace some sort of vague, American religiosity. Your comments deserved response and didn’t get it.Herb Stahlke

  • David Bolton

    Sally: Mitt was quoting from John Adams. Try and Google Mr. Adams to read who he was. How stupid can you be?

  • Manhattanite

    Re: Romney’s SpeechJohn Adams – I suggest Ms. Quinn familiarize herself w him and his writings before answering any more questions regarding Mr. Romney’s speech.

  • Dennis Barnes

    I heard your comments on Huckabees speech. You should be ashamed of yourself! That you have a soapbox is despicable and outright mean toward those of who have faith in Jesus Christ. If you knew he was quoting John Adams, then you are even more dangerous. You then show yourself to be very fearful of the those who believe in God and natural law.

  • Miranda

    You are so ignorant about the thoughts of the founding father’s that it is amazing you still want to live in America. Our country was founded on religious principles!!!!!!!!!!!!! For our American Society to continue we must continue to embrace the good that religion leads us to!!!! Our Founding Fathers embraced the natural rights given to manby God and our need to remain a good and Godly people to perpetuate this miracle know as the United States of America. Youe lack of knowledge can be remediated by reading. TRY IT!!

  • Is she an American?

    Since you take exception to John Adams words I would have to conclude that you have no understadning of “who we are”. You might want to find citizenship with a country that suits your needs as you are clearly without understdsnding of God, the US Constitution and being an American. God and natural law are part and parcel of America.I am continually amazed at people like you that “don’t get it”.God speed to you in your search for happiness.SincerelyDavid Hirsch, Frisco, Texas

  • Miranda again

    God is essential to our country’s continuation and is essential to our Freedom. Our founding documents speak of “inalienable right,” our rights MUST come from GOD or they are then given to us by govenment and can be removed!!! If they are given to us by God then government cannot take them away!!! See the difference – that is why the founding fathers decreed that our rights were given to us by God and thus cannot be taken by government!!

  • Miranda again

    God is essential to our country’s continuation and is essential to our Freedom. Our founding documents speak of “inalienable right,” our rights MUST come from GOD or they are then given to us by govenment and can be removed!!! If they are given to us by God then government cannot take them away!!! See the difference – that is why the founding fathers decreed that our rights were given to us by God and thus cannot be taken by government!!

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  • Andre Girnau

    SAlly Romneys speech about Religion was right this country was founded by Christians for Christians. Adams did believe and was right that without Christian principles there was no freedom or tolerance. Also every belief is a religion whether its Judaism Islamic Christian buddist Secularism or Atheism which is theReligion of self. furthermore Atheists are the most intolerant people in the world insisting their religion be the only ne in the public sqaure through secularism. so they are hateful and intolerant of others. furthermore this country was not made for liberals which is why most of them hate this country.

  • dave johnson

    Quinn you are an idiot!!!!

  • rich

    your analysis of romney’s speech was pathetic. you are simply agenda driven, void of objective analysis.

  • rich

    your analysis of romney’s speech was pathetic. you are simply agenda driven, void of objective analysis.

  • rich

    your analysis of romney’s speech was pathetic. you are simply agenda driven, void of objective analysis.

  • rich

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  • Martin Ryan

    Mrs. Quinn,

  • Anton Hofman

    May I present to you some clear and focussed answers to the “religion” question. Answers which have been symbolically declared from the beginning of creation. Symbolically, in order to address every person of every nation, on an almost daily basis revealing the Creator’s ID. My web site http://www.antonhofman.comHere‘s an excerpt: “IN PLAIN VIEW – YET OUT OF SIGHT”Without our sun no life on earth can exist, nor can life be maintained. All living depends upon it and everything is exposed to its heat.The symbol for knowledge is ‘light’, hence the sun represents ‘Total Knowledge’ which can only be ascribed to – God.God’s Word the Bible informs us that we should look to the beginning of creation to glean life’s destiny.Isaiah 46:9-10 Remember the former things of old: for I am God and there is none else; I am God and there is none like me, Declaring the end from the beginning and from ancient times the things that are not yet done, saying, My counsel shall stand and I will do all my pleasure: This scripture informs to look at the beginning of creation for what is in store for us in the future.About two thousand years ago a man named Jesus walked among us who taught using parables, i.e. word pictures. He said that he, – is the light of the world. John 8:12 Then spoke Jesus again to them, saying, I am the light of the world: John 1:18 No man has seen God at any time, the only begotten Son which is in the bosom of the Father, he has declared him. John 1:1 In the beginning was the Word and the Word was with God and the Word was God.John 10:30 I and my Father are one. John 5:19 Then replied Jesus and said to them, Verily, verily, I say to you, The Son can do nothing of himself but what he sees the Father do: for what things soever he does, these also does the Son likewise. John 3:16 For God so loved the world that he gave his only begotten Son that whosoever believes in him should not perish but have everlasting life. Revelation 3:20 Behold, I stand at the door and knock: if any man hear my voice and open the door, I will come in to him and will sup with him and he with me. Besides light, the sun sends out heat, representing the Holy Spirit; that’s God’s love drawing mankind and while light may be shut out, heat enters everywhere.John 6:44 No man can come to me, except the Father which has sent me draw him: Note that the sun, its light and heat make for three in one, representing, God the Father, the Son and Holy Spirit, also known as the Trinity – and has been an enigma for many.John 14:6 Jesus said to him, I am the way, the truth and the life: no man comes to the Father but by me.Isaiah 42:8 I am the LORD: that is my name: and my glory will I not share with another neither my praise to graven images. These represent God’s children. Come morning the sun appears and all other stars become invisible. Thus, God will not share his glory. God is faithful, so is the sun. Never missed a day showing up to do its wondrous works.Psalms 139:12 Yea, the darkness hides not from you; but the night shines as the day: the darkness and the light are both alike to you. After Jesus’s resurrection he returned to the Father in heaven but earlier stated that he would never leave us.Can there be any doubt about the existance and identity of the Creator?www.antonhofman.com

  • Jane Peirce (Wood)

    Dear Sally,I remember you well from our Smith days, and am fascinated that the years have brought us to such a similar stance. Although I am a cradle Episcoplian, I too find, in this phase of my existence, that the quest for understandng is my main focus.Thank you for providing us a forum.

  • Jane Peirce (Wood)

    Dear Sally,I remember you well from our Smith days, and am fascinated that the years have brought us to such a similar stance. Although I am a cradle Episcoplian, I too find, in this phase of my existence, that the quest for understandng is my main focus.Thank you for providing us a forum.

  • Jane Peirce (Wood)

    Dear Sally,I remember you well from our Smith days and am fascinated that the years have brought us to such a similar stance. Although I am a cradle Episcopalian, I find, at this phase of my existence, that the quest for understanding is my main focus.Thank you for providing us a forum!

  • Jane Peirce (Wood)

    Dear Sally,I remember you well from our Smith days and am fascinated that the years have brought us to such a similar stance. Although I am a cradle Episcopalian, I find, at this phase of my existence, that the quest for understanding is my main focus.Thank you for providing us a forum!

  • Nanette

    My comment pertains to the Charlie Rose discussion on PBS, broadcast December 6th on Mitt Romney and his faith. It is indefensable to contradict another’s stated belief in Jesus Christ and tell them that they don’t believe and are not Christians simply because they don’t share the same creed. For a Latter-day Saint Christian in particular, who bases their entire belief system on the divinity of Jesus Christ and their personal relationship with him, it is particularly cruel and ironic to be told by fellow Christians that their faith in the Biblical Jesus Christ is not Christianity. If faith in Jesus Christ is not Christianity, then what is Christianity?

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  • Robbins Mitchell

    Until I heard her comments about Mitt Romney’s speech yesterday,I had no earthly idea what a bigoted little airhead Ben Bradley’s ex piece of pussy really was….I suppose I should at least be grateful to her for exposing herself in such and arrogant and condescending manner

  • William D. Tallman

    I watched the Charlie Rose broadcast on Romney’s religion speech, and discovered Jon Meacham and Sally Quinn. Intrigued by their thoughtful refusal to follow the standard socially correct position on the matter, I looked them up and found this site. It was fascinating to discover that Quinn is a confirmed atheist who is nevertheless determined to do due diligence as an investigative journalist.My own experiences have not been unlike those of Ms. Quinn: I grew up unable to grasp the reality of the claims and assertions of Christianity, and gave it up as a bad job rather early on. The descriptions of religious spirituality sounded all too close to the experience that a (musical) performer shares with the audience, and so I was not disturbed by the sometimes pressure to get “saved”.Nonetheless, the fact that religion is such a profound basis of western civilization left me in the position of an outsider, unable to comprehend what everyone else seemingly understood as a matter of course. I finally took refuge in the realm of Mark Twain, Ambrose Bierce, and the like: the spectacle of civilized mummery concerning matters and issues about which not a shred of evidence is known to exist did not leave me overly sanguine about the sanity of my fellows.As religion has become an increasingly active source of influence in our times, I undertook to find out as much as I could about the realities involved. I read history, and have continued to keep current about the findings of scholarly historians and archaeologists. What I’ve discovered leaves me in the awkward position of being fairly clear about matters about which others are evidently completely unaware.I guess I’d recommend such a study to Ms. Quinn, as she has avoided the almost inevitable preconceptions that are the heritage of western society. What one discovers explains much, but leaves the problem of current religious polarization even more apparently unresolvable. Matters of attested historical fact cannot be countenanced by the religious public, and so one feels compelled to conclude that there is nothing to be done.I’ve deliberately tried to avoid going there, preferring to retain some hope for future generations. The problem is, what can one actually do with some prospects of success? Which leaves me to wonder whether or not Ms. Quinn has asked the same sort of questions.Perhaps a discussion about/of the historical basis of religion could be useful; I suspect it would be highly controversial in any case, but there may be value to be found there. I’m curious about what response she and/or others might offer in this regard. It seems possible, however remotely, that some light be shed on the enormous amount of heat generated about these matters.William D. Tallman

  • Carolean

    I went to Catholic school as a child and was “raised Catholic” more or less, my parents were not particularly into going to church on a regular basis, though I know my father believed deeply in God and idolized the Pope(s) during my childhood. I am not sure about my mother, she was highly intelligent and curious and an avid reader who was self-educated. I’m sure she had her doubts but would never in the world voice them in the late 1940s and 1950s when I was growing up. She died in 1967 at the age of 49 from lung cancer. I know had she lived longer, this is a subject we would have eventually seriously discussed, but that wasn’t meant to be. I disliked Catholic school, the nuns in those days were very strict and authoritarian, and we were physically punished for the most minor infractions, such as chewing gum. Eventually we moved to a town where apparently the decision was made by my parents to send us to public school. I was in fourth or fifth grade at that time.My mother was always sickly and being quite poor, our lives were not easy. I remember “praying” from time to time, mostly when my mother was sick. But somehow, slowly, while I was still very young, I began to doubt. I never discussed this with my siblings and certainly not my parents, as I was still afraid what I was thinking was a “sin.”By the time I married a man from a very devout Irish Catholic family in the early 60s, I already knew I did not believe as he did. He seemed to recognize this and we tried to discuss it, but he was a “take it on faith” type of individual and did not appreciate my probing questions. It became a barrier between us. I went to church with him and our children on Sundays, but it meant nothing to me. He encouraged me to attend various weekend “retreats” with the wives of some of our Catholic friends. While I tried to stay openminded throughout these sessions, I knew I was just going through the motions. Eventually, for this and other reasons, we were divorced in the early 70s. I then became a single working mother with four children (I had four girls in four and one-half years) during a time when that demographic was still very rare. My husband remarried a second, then a third time, the last time to an extremely devout Catholic, a Mexican woman, and that marriage has endured. Unfortunately, my ex-husband has had several heart attacks and strokes and now, in his 70s, is a mere shadow of the once strong-willed and dynamic man he once was.As for me, I have finally “come out of the closet.” I have told a few people, including my youngest daughter, that I am an atheist, a non-believer, and have been for many, many years. She had come to that same decision on her own, without input or encouragement from me. I do not discuss it with my other three daughters, and she does not either. I have a friend or two I dare discuss it with, but I find most people, even if they have doubts, are still reluctant to admit to full blown atheism, rather some might say they “doubt” or are “agnostic.” While I am not a “militant” atheist in any way, I do find it troubling that recognition and full acceptance of atheism is a very long way off in this country and the world. I also find it upsetting that religion is so entangled with politics. I believe strongly in the separation of church and state and, while I will not get into politics in this commentary, I am wary of the current crop of presidential candidates who wear their religion on their sleeves, who do not even believe in evolution, and actually think “God” wants them to be president. We claim that God is on our side in wars too, all the while condemning the other side for doing exactly the same thing. I have nothing against believers who truly live their lives trying to be good people. I have lived mine the same way. Unfortunately, I believe great evil has been done in the name of religion for many centuries, and this will continue and perhaps get worse in the current world climate of religious hatred among the different beliefs.I am new to this site, this is my first post. I thank Sally Quinn and John Meacham for providing a forum wherein we can discuss this issue, at long last.

  • Richard Williams

    Is it really possible for someone like Ms. Quinn to be that ignorant about the founding of America? Wow.

  • Bonnie Calcagno

    Isn’t a journalist suppose to present at least two sides to every story? When I see Sally Quinn and Jon Meacham’s pictures on this web site, I think “monologue” not “dialogue”. If there were a discussion between Jon Meacham and Richard Dawkins or Dan Dennett then, in my opinion, assumptions might be challenged and the search for truth better served.

  • Bonnie Calcagno

    Isn’t a journalist suppose to present at least two sides to every story? When I see Sally Quinn and Jon Meacham’s pictures on this web site, I think “monologue” not “dialogue”. If there were a discussion between Jon Meacham and Richard Dawkins or Dan Dennett then, in my opinion, assumptions might be challenged and the search for truth better served.

  • Diane Stirling-Stevens

    Goodness, after reading all these posts (and mine being the last), I’m truly ‘bug-eyed’. I enjoy the exchange and very glad Sally has created this web-site for solid discussion.I decided to insert my JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR CD while reading; in 1973 it took 7 trips to the theatre for me to fully grasp not only the message of ‘things past’, but ‘things future’. I remember a large New York newspaper calling this film every darned negative thing it could muster up. I was so disturbed at their review, I sent a long letter; it was published in a timely manner, and it accompanies the many clippings I have in my scrap-book as I’ve spoken out over the years, and my remarks have been shared in several cities.I saw a person write on this site, that she wanted the atheist to get out her ‘damned face’, and this really stunned me; coming from a Christian, it surely is out of character.I read that another was an atheist and had kept her positive attitude, and after choosing this concept (I guessing she was once a Christian), nothing about her had changed. I agree with this person 100% – there’s no ‘mark’ on the fore-head (or elsewhere), that denotes a person’s beliefs or their thoughts.I confess to having been an active, practicing Christian from child-hood until events in my life caused me to look at other philosophies and concepts. I find it hard to believe any ancient ‘text’; the way they’ve already created different and updated versions of the King-James Bible just in my lifetime!I do UTILIZE the Bible in my life because to me, it is a valuable ‘hand-book’, and it outlines a proper program for charitable living. I’d even propose the Bible was initiated in those ancient times, to assist the people of the area with the plight and difficulties common to this part of the world (and still is common to this part of the world).I do respect the efforts of Jesus Christ; a diamond that glittered to those that followed him, and a wise sage who could truly foresee things in the years to come, that would pose a threat to the well-being of mankind.I find the works of Carl Sagan inspiring; Dawkins as well. I think the great thinkers of any period that choose to share their thoughts, are part of those steps to the ‘heaven’ that might exist as some thing of as a place to dwell with God, and others merely know that you can bring as much heaven down to earth in your life, if you diligently try to follow not only the words of Christ, but other humanitarians.When one is a child and mother turns those blobs of dough into delectable cookies, our small minds see that as turning water into wine. We can come unto ourselves as a child; keep the child spirit alive, but we can incorporate the wisdom of the experienced and those who’ve matured to that ‘ripe old age’ we often think of as our hair turns gray, and the lines are added to our faces.I believe Sally incorporates the ‘all’ a person can be; she’s not trying to leverage her ‘social or economic status’, and I don’t see her taking anything she does or says, lightly. Sally’s obvious sincerity can only be misconstrued by the envious; the un-educated, or the negative thoughts that dwell in the mind of the person making an assessment of her purposes and motives. Sally knows her mind; her heart, and she exudes the calm any sincere and devoted person has.I suggest we remember the ‘Doubting Thomas’; the denial of Peter, and see that even within the disciples of Jesus, there was tension and disagreement. Nevertheless, I’m guessing that with all disputes and doubt in tow, there was something that told them to follow this man’s great wisdom; Sally strikes me as a leader to follow as well.

  • Diane Stirling-Stevens

    Goodness, after reading all these posts (and mine being the last), I’m truly ‘bug-eyed’. I enjoy the exchange and very glad Sally has created this web-site for solid discussion.I decided to insert my JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR CD while reading; in 1973 it took 7 trips to the theatre for me to fully grasp not only the message of ‘things past’, but ‘things future’. I remember a large New York newspaper calling this film every darned negative thing it could muster up. I was so disturbed at their review, I sent a long letter; it was published in a timely manner, and it accompanies the many clippings I have in my scrap-book as I’ve spoken out over the years, and my remarks have been shared in several cities.I saw a person write on this site, that she wanted the atheist to get out her ‘damned face’, and this really stunned me; coming from a Christian, it surely is out of character.I read that another was an atheist and had kept her positive attitude, and after choosing this concept (I guessing she was once a Christian), nothing about her had changed. I agree with this person 100% – there’s no ‘mark’ on the fore-head (or elsewhere), that denotes a person’s beliefs or their thoughts.I confess to having been an active, practicing Christian from child-hood until events in my life caused me to look at other philosophies and concepts. I find it hard to believe any ancient ‘text’; the way they’ve already created different and updated versions of the King-James Bible just in my lifetime!I do UTILIZE the Bible in my life because to me, it is a valuable ‘hand-book’, and it outlines a proper program for charitable living. I’d even propose the Bible was initiated in those ancient times, to assist the people of the area with the plight and difficulties common to this part of the world (and still is common to this part of the world).I do respect the efforts of Jesus Christ; a diamond that glittered to those that followed him, and a wise sage who could truly foresee things in the years to come, that would pose a threat to the well-being of mankind.I find the works of Carl Sagan inspiring; Dawkins as well. I think the great thinkers of any period that choose to share their thoughts, are part of those steps to the ‘heaven’ that might exist as some thing of as a place to dwell with God, and others merely know that you can bring as much heaven down to earth in your life, if you diligently try to follow not only the words of Christ, but other humanitarians.When one is a child and mother turns those blobs of dough into delectable cookies, our small minds see that as turning water into wine. We can come unto ourselves as a child; keep the child spirit alive, but we can incorporate the wisdom of the experienced and those who’ve matured to that ‘ripe old age’ we often think of as our hair turns gray, and the lines are added to our faces.I believe Sally incorporates the ‘all’ a person can be; she’s not trying to leverage her ‘social or economic status’, and I don’t see her taking anything she does or says, lightly. Sally’s obvious sincerity can only be misconstrued by the envious; the un-educated, or the negative thoughts that dwell in the mind of the person making an assessment of her purposes and motives. Sally knows her mind; her heart, and she exudes the calm any sincere and devoted person has.I suggest we remember the ‘Doubting Thomas’; the denial of Peter, and see that even within the disciples of Jesus, there was tension and disagreement. Nevertheless, I’m guessing that with all disputes and doubt in tow, there was something that told them to follow this man’s great wisdom; Sally strikes me as a leader to follow as well.

  • Diane Stirling-Stevens

    I apologize for the space I took on the previous post; however one post script to Sally’s remarks:I noticed in Sally’s excellent review, she used a number of ‘labels’, e.g. “Mormon”, “Christians”, and the like. To me, labels (as they now seem to be so common and defining) should be used to remind us about the quality (or lack thereof) of a piece of merchandise we’ve purchased. I like Reeboks; some like Nike, etc. I do NOT believe we should ‘label’ people; yet it seems we do.If we could REMOVE those ‘labels’; stop with acknowledging a certain ‘nation’ as opposed to being aware that we ALL LIVE ON THIS PLANET, and become ‘color-blind’, we might prove that to ignore (ignorance) could very well be ‘bliss’!A two-party system means sometimes to simply pit one against another. To define a deity we think exists, and then fragment that by spinning off into a ‘religious group’, could certainly dilute the power of the very deity many believe in.I don’t want to cut the pumpkin pie into 8 pieces because I can’t eat a slice that’s been cut into 4. I don’t want to have a ‘piece of the pie’; I want the pie to feed all that need to be fed.We complicate the simple; we simplify the complex…we are, indeed, a strange creature. I like being one of those ‘strange creatures’, but I think it’s time to recognize there are about 6,000,000,000 of those ‘creatures’ that require the same things in life, and it’s time to clump them together in the name of ‘good’, and forget ‘faith and deities’ – what is obvious requires no label, we’re all in the same ‘pigeon-hole’.

  • Diane Stirling-Stevens

    I apologize for the space I took on the previous post; however one post script to Sally’s remarks:I noticed in Sally’s excellent review, she used a number of ‘labels’, e.g. “Mormon”, “Christians”, and the like. To me, labels (as they now seem to be so common and defining) should be used to remind us about the quality (or lack thereof) of a piece of merchandise we’ve purchased. I like Reeboks; some like Nike, etc. I do NOT believe we should ‘label’ people; yet it seems we do.If we could REMOVE those ‘labels’; stop with acknowledging a certain ‘nation’ as opposed to being aware that we ALL LIVE ON THIS PLANET, and become ‘color-blind’, we might prove that to ignore (ignorance) could very well be ‘bliss’!A two-party system means sometimes to simply pit one against another. To define a deity we think exists, and then fragment that by spinning off into a ‘religious group’, could certainly dilute the power of the very deity many believe in.I don’t want to cut the pumpkin pie into 8 pieces because I can’t eat a slice that’s been cut into 4. I don’t want to have a ‘piece of the pie’; I want the pie to feed all that need to be fed.We complicate the simple; we simplify the complex…we are, indeed, a strange creature. I like being one of those ‘strange creatures’, but I think it’s time to recognize there are about 6,000,000,000 of those ‘creatures’ that require the same things in life, and it’s time to clump them together in the name of ‘good’, and forget ‘faith and deities’ – what is obvious requires no label, we’re all in the same ‘pigeon-hole’.

  • Lou in Jacksonville FL

    I saw Sally on the Travis Smiley show, dispensing her personal diatribe on religion, as one who didn’t really follow what people get out of being religious, yet trying to profess her fledgling association with being religious, but to what she seemed to have no idea.Suffice it to say that Christians are people that profess to have a personal relationship with Jesus Christ.I once read a quote from Hugh Nibley that stated:”There is an enemy of all righteousness — but he is a disembodied spirit. How do we come to grips with him? Very intimately and immediately; he enters, or seeks to enter, right into us individually.I find it interesting that we don’t go to communists to understand about democracy, and we don’t go to socialists to understand about capitalism, yet people do go to anti-mormons to understand about Mormonism, and they go to anti-catholics to understand about Catholics, and they go to atheists and agnostics to understand about Christianity. A paradox? Lou

  • Lou in Jacksonville FL

    I saw Sally on the Travis Smiley show, dispensing her personal diatribe on religion, as one who didn’t really follow what people get out of being religious, yet trying to profess her fledgling association with being religious, but to what she seemed to have no idea.Suffice it to say that Christians are people that profess to have a personal relationship with Jesus Christ.I once read a quote from Hugh Nibley that stated:”There is an enemy of all righteousness — but he is a disembodied spirit. How do we come to grips with him? Very intimately and immediately; he enters, or seeks to enter, right into us individually.I find it interesting that we don’t go to communists to understand about democracy, and we don’t go to socialists to understand about capitalism, yet people do go to anti-mormons to understand about Mormonism, and they go to anti-catholics to understand about Catholics, and they go to atheists and agnostics to understand about Christianity. A paradox? Lou

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  • Jim Morrison

    Sally,You Rock! Seriously, I applaud your efforts! For the last ten years I have been teaching a world religion course in a public high (juniors and seniors at Red Wing Area High School, MN.). It is a course I developed after coming to the conclusion that if schools are serious about teaching and celebrating diversity they must not stop at the doors of religion.The first year was hell – death threats, law suits, harassment – all coming from conservative religious groups accusing me of polluting the minds of children with false ideas and doing the devil’s work. It became a huge public debate in our community; the newspapers were flooded with letters. What a year! Somehow I survived, as did the course. Keep up the good work! Thank you. It’s nice to know I’m not alone in my desire to truly educate people about religion and the effect it has on people and culture. Jim

  • William F Tibor

    Finally, someone applies rational to the unrational. Religion like water will seek it’s level. Believe will follow it’s need. Let choice, not threat, or fear determine faith, or lack of it.

  • Carolean

    I embrace Diane Stirling-Stevens’ comment about “removing all labels.” Unfortunately, mankind has a long way to go before total acceptance of each human being, without judgment emanating from our own beliefs, can happen. Just look at the world today, more religiously bigoted and full of hate than it has ever been in my lifetime (and I am approaching 70). I feel no animosity toward someone who lives his or her life according to a belief system that is not harmful to others. If someone is doing good in this world because of a belief that motivates the person to empathize with and respect others, what possible wrong could come from that? My lack of a structured religion does not stop me from loving my neighbor regardless of that individual’s personal beliefs or ethnicity. I have certainly disliked people in my lifetime because of their character, their actions, and their lack of caring, or just plain meanness, either toward me or toward others. That’s a criteria deserving of my animosity, and I have fought like hell when I had to which is part of this life too, and it takes strength to get through it. I am proud to say I have been strong.Life is short, it starts with the fertilization of an egg with sperm (which can now be done in a petri dish). We live and enjoy this earth and its many wonders, we propagate, we love, we grieve, we learn, we wonder, and we decide, finally, if we are lucky, who we are and what we believe. Then the day comes when our lives are over, and we die, while the earth remains, our loved ones remain, and everything goes on as before. Hopefully during our time here, we have touched others, made someone happy, made a difference. While certainly not without fear, this is an acceptable concept to me. That’s all atheism is, my friends, just acceptance of the natural order of things. It’s the process that every living thing has to go through. It’s very simple when you think of it that way.

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  • Elliott Simko

    Dear Sally,Hello my name is Elliott, and I am a wisdom-seeking citizen of the world, like yourself, but I also happen to find something compelling in what I have learned from what I have heard and read about the life of Christ. I consider myself a follower of Christ, but hesitate to tell people this and do not identify myself as a Christian for that reason. The apostle Paul wrote that disciples of Christ are “ambassadors of Christ” to the world. I won’t patronize you, a political and religious journalist, on the responsibility an ambassador has to fairly, justly, and wholly represent the people of their nation to another nation. The hypocrisy you experienced as a child and have observed, as I have, through your adult life is not unique to the religion or even pious people but an inescapable inevitability of the human condition. I’m so sorry for the terrible experiences you’ve been through, especially in the care of those who purport to have your best interests in mind. More offensive still, these people would probably presume to have a monopoly on discerning and sharing “love.” I really liked the quote you found from Martin Buber about God being the electricity surging between two people in a relationship. Still I think if there is a God he/she/it would be more intricate to human existence than an energy that comes and goes. I believe that God is closely related to love, if not entirely comprised of and propagating love constantly. It begs the question what is love, and more importantly why would God be associated with it, considering all the suffering in the world. These questions lead to more questions which I have only begun to seek the answers to. I have an itchy suspicion that as Bob Dylan said, “the answers are blowing in the wind, my friend.”I haven’t picked up a newspaper in years, sadly I am a product of the internet generation–i apologize–yet somehow today i happened upon your article in the December 23, Sunday Washington Post entitled “Congress’s Bullying Pulpit.” I have yet to research what exactly H.R.847 is, and whether it establishes, destroys, or otherwise alters law in the United States in anyway. From what I read in your article it seemed just like a statement of support to a particle group of people. It is unclear in the article to me whether you are frustrated because that group is dominant in the House and seems to be patting its own back instead of recoginizing a minority, or for that matter all people of all kinds, of all faiths, or non-faiths. Or are you frustrated in the manner it was gone about. The title after all (Congress’s Bullying…) indicates that you perceive H.R.847 as a majority twisting the arms of a minority to agree with their support of the majority (the majority I’m talking about here is the 3/4 of the population who identity themselves as Christians). If you’re upset about the majority, isn’t it the democratic republic you are upset about, not religion. It is after all a democratic republic system of government that not only enables but depends on a majority to decide on issues. It also depends on the integrity of leaders, especially leaders in a minority, to stand up to the majority if it is acting unjustly. Jesus’ teaching remind us that walking a life of love and integrity is “walking the straight and narrow” while “broad is the path and wide is the gate that leads to destruction.” I have no doubt that there will always be a majority in every government and every nation that seeks its own success at the expense and neglect of others. It is when the wise leaders of the minority, the disinfranchised, the meek, and the weak sit idle and do nothing (say nothing) that injustice is allowed to prevail. I am not upset with the blind fraternity of political bullies in power, I am upset with the few conscience driven and justice-seeking individuals in power who (like the Jewish member of congress you mentioned) do nothing. I follow Jesus’ teachings because when he saw wrong in the fraternity of polotical bullies of his time (the pharisees, Sadducees, and roman empire) he did not sit quietly but made a noise to wake people up. I am not upset with the noisy ignorant, for they know no better even though they ought, I am upset with the quiet wise, for they do know better and still do nothing. What good is wisdom if you do not act on it? Jesus asked a similar question of the religious-political leaders of his time. I think you might have more in common with Jesus than you think.Thank you for speaking up and not sitting idle. Your integrity inspires me, I hope you never waste the wisdom you find, and continue to act to better the world and give faith to those ignored, rejected, or neglected by the rulers of this world, again a similarity you bear to Christ. If you have the time I would love to hear a response, either here on by e-mail. You can reach me at talksnwalks@gmail.com.God Bless you and your good works Sally Quinn.Your Friend,

  • Elliott Simko

    Dear Sally,Hello my name is Elliott, and I am a wisdom-seeking citizen of the world, like yourself, but I also happen to find something compelling in what I have learned from what I have heard and read about the life of Christ. I consider myself a follower of Christ, but hesitate to tell people this and do not identify myself as a Christian for that reason. The apostle Paul wrote that disciples of Christ are “ambassadors of Christ” to the world. I won’t patronize you, a political and religious journalist, on the responsibility an ambassador has to fairly, justly, and wholly represent the people of their nation to another nation. The hypocrisy you experienced as a child and have observed, as I have, through your adult life is not unique to religion or even pious people but an inescapable inevitability of the human condition. I’m so sorry for the terrible experiences you’ve been through, especially in the care of those who purport to have your best interests in mind. More offensive still, these people would probably presume to have a monopoly on discerning and sharing “love.” I really liked the quote you found from Martin Buber about God being the electricity surging between two people in a relationship. Still I think if there is a God he/she/it would be more intricate to human existence than an energy that comes and goes. I believe that God is closely related to love, if not entirely comprised of and propagating love constantly. It begs the question what is love, and more importantly why would God be associated with it, considering all the suffering in the world. These questions lead to more questions which I have only begun to seek the answers to. I have an itchy suspicion that as Bob Dylan said, “the answers are blowing in the wind, my friend.”I haven’t picked up a newspaper in years, sadly I am a product of the internet generation–i apologize–yet somehow today i happened upon your article in the December 23, Sunday Washington Post entitled “Congress’s Bullying Pulpit.” I have yet to research what exactly H.R.847 is, and whether it establishes, destroys, or otherwise alters law in the United States in anyway. From what I read in your article it seemed just like a statement of support to a particle group of people. It is unclear in the article to me whether you are frustrated because that group is dominant in the House and seems to be patting its own back instead of recoginizing a minority, or for that matter all people of all kinds, of all faiths, or non-faiths. Or are you frustrated in the manner it was gone about. The title after all (Congress’s Bullying…) indicates that you perceive H.R.847 as a majority twisting the arms of a minority to agree with their support of the majority (the majority I’m talking about here is the 3/4 of the population who identity themselves as Christians). If you’re upset about the majority, isn’t it the democratic republic you are upset about, not religion. It is after all a democratic republic system of government that not only enables but depends on a majority to decide on issues. It also depends on the integrity of leaders, especially leaders in a minority, to stand up to the majority if it is acting unjustly. Jesus’ teaching remind us that walking a life of love and integrity is “walking the straight and narrow” while “broad is the path and wide is the gate that leads to destruction.” I have no doubt that there will always be a majority in every government and every nation that seeks its own success at the expense and neglect of others. It is when the wise leaders of the minority, the disinfranchised, the meek, and the weak sit idle and do nothing (say nothing) that injustice is allowed to prevail. I am not upset with the blind fraternity of political bullies in power, I am upset with the few conscience driven and justice-seeking individuals in power who (like the Jewish member of congress you mentioned) do nothing. I follow Jesus’ teachings because when he saw wrong in the fraternity of polotical bullies of his time (the pharisees, Sadducees, and roman empire) he did not sit quietly but made a noise to wake people up. I am not upset with the noisy ignorant, for they know no better even though they ought, I am upset with the quiet wise, for they do know better and still do nothing. What good is wisdom if you do not act on it? Jesus asked a similar question of the religious-political leaders of his time. I think you might have more in common with Jesus than you think.Thank you for speaking up and not sitting idle. Your integrity inspires me, I hope you never waste the wisdom you find, and continue to act to better the world and give faith to those ignored, rejected, or neglected by the rulers of this world, again a similarity you bear to Christ. If you have the time I would love to hear a response, either here or by e-mail. You can reach me at talksnwalks@gmail.com.God Bless you and your good works Sally Quinn.Your Friend,

  • Scott G.

    Dear Ms. Quinn:In an article titled “Congress’s Bullying Pulpit” you wrote that you witnessed children being paddled. Many Christians believe that beating children is a godly thing to do and they cite various passages of the Bible to justify their belief. However, they fail to take into account some very important facts about human physiology.A human female’s buttocks and the upper third of the backs of her thighs contain sexually sensitive nerve endings that send nerve impulses directly to her clitoris. Those impulses can trigger an orgasm, which includes rhythmic contractions of her vagina. Those contractions can pump a male sex partner’s semen from her vagina to her uterus, thereby increasing the probability of conception and childbirth. Those nerve endings are naturally stimulated during dorso-ventral copulation (rear-entry sexual intercourse). A female’s buttocks and thighs are functional components of her reproductive system. Striking those organs with a paddle or other implement is an act of sexual abuse. If a girl is beaten on her buttocks then she can become psycho-sexually deranged. She will literally have a constellation of neurons in her brain that cause her to associate violent assault with sexual stimulation. She may be so severely deranged that, like Ann, she is unable to marry and have a family of her own. See Ann’s letter…”My well-meaning, loving, Christian parents, sexually abused me, without ANY idea of what they were doing.” Human females have sexually sensitive nerve endings in their buttocks and thighs because thirty million years ago our ancestors had four feet (they were quadrupeds) and copulation was always a rear-entry affair. The sexually sensitive nerves in a girl’s buttocks and thighs are proof we are the products of the process of evolution by means of natural selection. Most Christians are unlikely to acknowledge our quadrupedal heritage but they should at least acknowledge the sexually sensitivity nerves in girls’ buttocks and thighs and refrain from striking those organs.There is absolutely nothing godly about perpetrating sexual assaults on children. Christians should abandon that practice.

  • dianne futrelle

    i agree with congress expressing continued support for christians in the us. the majority of the citizens in the us are christians and should not have to deal with holiday trees and no merry christmas greetings. i said merry christmas to everyone who would listen this season. i normally do not say it that much. i do not object when other faiths have their holidays. it seems that christians are persecuted enough in other countries. lets not do it here.

  • Curtis Nester

    Sally Quinn’s article: “Congress’ Bullying Pulpit is just another example of the depths to which America has fallen. Sally, an avowed atheist writes as co-moderator of “On Faith” and does her best to misrepresent religion in general and Christianity in particular.She says that Congress’ resolution on the Christmas holiday somehow disenfranchised millions of people. Tell me how a resolution in Congress took away anyone’s voting privilege.She seems oblivious to the persecution that Christians in many parts of the world are enduring. I guess that’s the result of wearing atheist blinders.

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    I think Sally Quinn is a product of the republican nazi machine who has so vigorously put out the anti-Hillary propaganda. It is women like her that make me think of the young ignorant, submissive, and very impressionable high school girls who felt that their job was to open their legs and let men have their way with them and then follow blindly as they were told. It is saddening that Hillary is being attacked by the women in the media who have only the views that have been forced upon them, you women are setting the bar even higher for the equality and respect that women have been fighting so hard for. People think we have a long way when it comes to RACE but we have an even longer road when it comes to women’s equality and respect for the positions that they seek that many americans feel is not a woman’s place… Sally Quinn I hope that the Jon Meacham’s of the world lead you to the gate of HELL!

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    More or less nothing seems worth thinking about. Not much on my mind today. Today was a total loss. My mind is like a bunch of nothing, but maybe tomorrow. So it goes. I just don’t have much to say recently, but whatever.

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    Premarital sex is, is not wrong

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    Easter, Christmas is the best holiday – Or choose your own favorite and create another persuasive speech topic

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    I haven’t gotten anything done. Shrug. I’ve pretty much been doing nothing worth mentioning. So it goes.

  • Jermaine L Collier

    I just wanted to let you know that I saw you on MSNBC during the Barak Obama speech. Your words and how you analyze things are superb. You are so refreshing to see because you do not put spin on anything you tell it like it is. You are the exact opposite of Pat Buchanan. I am so sick of people like him always putting a political slant and always trying to stir up controversy that will create division. I am a man of strong faith and I look forward to reading your articles and getting to know you better. I hope to see you more on MSNBC, CNN or where ever you are needed to represent honesty and a unbiased opinion.Thank you!!

  • Ben

    Does the bible “say to blame the sin and not the sinner?” Where?

  • Ben

    Does the bible “say to blame the sin and not the sinner?” Where?

  • Ben

    Does the bible “say to blame the sin and not the sinner?” Where?

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    I haven’t been up to anything these days. Not much on my mind today. I just don’t have anything to say lately. I haven’t gotten much done lately. I’ve just been sitting around not getting anything done. Pretty much nothing exciting happening today, not that it matters.

  • Emily Miller Mundy

    Thank you to Ms. Quinn & Mr. Meacham for starting this site. I just discovered it and will be a constant visitor.

  • Emily Miller Mundy

    Thank you to Ms. Quinn & Mr. Meacham for starting this site. I just discovered it and will be a constant visitor.

  • Emily Miller Mundy

    Thank you to Ms. Quinn & Mr. Meacham for starting this site. I just discovered it and will be a constant visitor.

  • Margaret Adams-Ross (68)

    I honestly believe Sally Quinn had it right the first time when she saw religion as evil and of little redeeming value. It makes people stupid enough to vote for the current idiot in the White House not just once, but twice. And when bad things happen, the stupid people believe it was Satan’s fault or that their god works in mysterious ways. The stupid people also allow child rape farms in Texas and on the Arizona/Utah border because the polygamists just might be religious people. My senator Barry G. was correct when he said our congressmen should park their bibles at the door.

  • Steve R.

    The news about the Pope’s visit and the recent passage of “Easter” point to a selective reality concerning the reporting of news events by the media. I hope that “On Faith” will provide equal reporting time for the Non-Roman Catholic Christian denominations. 1. The Roman Catholic Church does not speak for Christianity, it is simply one of many Christian denominations. 2. As an Orthodox Christian it was distressing to me that the media when it reported on this past “Easter” that there was no apparent acknowledgment that Orthodox Christians would be celebrating Easter on April 27, 2008. I hope that the Post will be providing coverage of Orthodox Easter, including analysis of the Orthodox Christian Church.3. It would be nice if the movie/televison industry would have religious figures other than Roman Catholic clergy such as: Rabbis, Mormon Elders, Episcopal, and yes Orthodox Priests. Moral/religious guidance is not limited to the Roman Catholic Church.

  • Frederick Woolfall

    Sally,do you practice any religious persuasion at this moment in time? Why do you not try attending Roman Catholic, Protestant sect of your choosing & a Synagogue.

  • candide

    Ms. Quinn is far to tolerant and polite towards religious nuts.

  • Mary Ann Lacqua

    I heard you on Imus this morning and there was not enough time for you to share more. I have been brought up Catholic and I too embrace many religions. My sister once brought me to a black womens church in Brooklyn. Let me tell you, “this church rocked.” The women were dress to the nines and every women in the church got up and spoke. Nobody attending this church was anxious to leave. Everyone look like they got there and intended to spend a good part of the day there and they were going to enjoy it to. My sister and I enjoyed the joy that they seem to spread among each other. The support system that they had for each other seem to more then get them through the week ahead. What is wonderful about life, and that is what makes me beleive. No matter how bad things are it is what we do with the bad things that count. The way people pull together in bad times makes for a better life. Bottom line, without bad times, life would not be as wonderful as it is.

  • J. Dietrich

    I am an undecided voter, but since the Wright controversy, I am begining to lean towards B. Obama. My reasoning is not entirely clear in my mine, but I can’t help wondering what really would happen to America if Obama did become president. So, the only reason I can see for wanting B. Obama is based on curiosity. Another thought is, if I am leaning toward B. Obama, I wonder if others are too for the same reason of curiosity. If so, then was this whole episode staged to get people like me to side with Obama. I wonder.

  • J. Dietrich

    I am an undecided voter, but since the Wright contoversy, I am begining to lean towards B. Obama. My reasoning is not entirely clear in my mine, but I can’t help wondering what really would happen to America if Obama did become president. So, the only reason I can see for wanting B. Obama is based on curiosity. Another thought is, if I am leaning toward B. Obama, I wonder if others are too for the same reason of curiosity. If so, then was this whole episode staged to get people like me to side with Obama. I wonder.

  • Mark Ira Kaufman

    I heard your comments on the BBC’s program “World Have Your Say.”I take exception to your benign and affectionate depiction of Black Liberation Theology. While it certainly has made Christianity more relevant for Black Americans, there is an ugly facet to it as well. And Rev. Wright’s controversial and divisive rhetoric reflects that unpleasant side of this theology.James Cone, who can rightly be regarded as one of the ‘founding fathers’ of Black Liberation Theology, wrote in his his book, “A Black Theology of Liberation,” the following: “Black theology will accept only the love of God which participates in the destruction of the white enemy.” He also wrote, “The task of black theology is to kill Gods who do not belong to the black community …”I was raised to believe that any God Who is not the God of all humanity is a false God.As such, it is not unreasonable to question a theology which validates itself by invalidating people of other races.Furthermore, such an exclusive belief system is an affront to me and all other Americans of every color who fought so hard for racial equality in the 1960’s and 1970’s.

  • J. Dietrich

    I am an undecided voter, but since the Wright controversy, I am begining to lean towards B. Obama. My reasoning is not entirely clear in my head, but I can’t help wondering what really would happen to America if Obama did become president. So, the only reason I can see for wanting B. Obama is based on curiosity. Another thought is, if I am leaning toward B. Obama, I wonder if others are too for the same reason of curiosity. If so, then was this whole episode staged to get people like me to side with Obama. I wonder.

  • C. Robinson

    Ms. Quinn –I hope you have been receiving tons of email about the following.On the Charlie Rose show the other night, you stated that Barack Obama had no choice other than to be viewed as a Black man because he “looks” Black. Your statement implies that given a choice that no person in their right mind would choose to be Black. In fact, Barack did choose, just like Tiger Woods made a choice. Tiger’s choice was to not identify as Black, but as CaBlaAsian and marry a White woman. And others who look as White as you have chosen to self-identify as Black. Barack certainly had the same choice. Obama could have chosen to identify as a person of mix-race, like Tiger Woods and others, and marry someone other than a Black woman. But Barak – at some point in his life – chose to self-identify as Black. So despite what White folks like you may think, there are many Black people who proudly choose to identify as Black. And even many more who in the words of Trinity United Church of Christ are unashamedly and unapologetically Black.All the best to you — C. Robinson

  • tim k

    Why does Sally defend the comments of Rev. Wright?

  • Pamela Lieber Merrick, NY 11566

    Dear Ms. Quinn:

  • David Wendell

    I agree with the following Bill Donahue article from June 25, 2008 SALLY QUINN’S NARCISSISMQuinn, who was an atheist most of her life, posted on Monday why she decided to go to Communion: “Last Wednesday I was determined to take it [the Eucharist] for Tim, transubstantiation notwithstanding. I’m so glad I did. It made me feel closer to him. And it was worth it just to imagine how he would have loved it.” Quinn also admitted the following: “I had only taken communion once in my life, at an evangelical church. It was soon after I had started ‘On Faith’ and I wanted to see what it was like. Oddly I had a slightly nauseated sensation after I took it, knowing that in some way it represented the body and blood of Jesus Christ.” Catholic League president Bill Donohue had this to say:“Just reading what Sally Quinn said is enough to give any Christian, especially Catholics, more than a ‘slightly nauseating sensation.’ In her privileged world, life is all about experiences and feelings. “Moreover, Quinn’s statement not only reeks of narcissism, it shows a profound disrespect for Catholics and the beliefs they hold dear. If she really wanted to get close to Tim Russert, she should have found a way to do so without trampling on Catholic sensibilities. Like praying for him—that’s what Catholics do.”

  • Devon MacDuff

    Dear Ms. Quinn,

  • Jim Manning

    It’s all “form over substance” with you, isn’t it?

  • Michael Carr

    Sally,Why didn’t you respect Catholic faith and sensibilities regarding reception of the Blessed Eucharist at the Tim Russett funeral?Did you realize that what you did is sacreligious in “not recognizing the Body and Blood of the Lord”?Do you think your ego is a bit inflated?I’m guessing you will not respond to this.

  • John Sammon

    I just read about your taking Communion at Tim Russert’s funeral. No doubt, because of your elitist arrogance, the point of my admonition will be missed by you entirely, but “shame on you” needs to be said anyway!

  • Ken Balaskovits

    I understand through an article in the Catalyst that you, Sally Quinn, received communion at the funeral Mass for Tim Russert. I find your actions deplorable and an insult to all Roman Catholics and Tim Russert specifically. If there was any way to disrespect the memory of Tim Russert, you achieved that goal by insulting the Catholic religion which he held most dear.