Women Vital in Christianity

Contrary to popular stereotypes — and the way in which some religions, like Islam, oppress women — the Christian faith … Continued

Contrary to popular stereotypes — and the way in which some religions, like Islam, oppress women — the Christian faith has been the single greatest source for the advancement of women’s rights. The church in the third century was spread through Rome by women who were welcomed into the young church.

Though the Roman church has never ordained women, the Roman Church has exalted the state of women through Mary. Protestant churches do ordain women, and in all churches women have a vital role. Women play a vital complementarian role. It should be noted that most of the people involved in the suffrage movement were Christian women, and the right to vote was strongly supported by the Christian church.

The popular idea that women are in submission to men ignores the reality of the ordained biblical relationship. Yes, wives are to submit to their husbands, but husbands are to give their lives for their wives, exactly as Christ gave His life for the church (Ephesians 5:22-23).

  • kert1

    Those are some very good points about Christian Women. In my experience christian women are some of the happiest, best treated women I know. I have to think that having a loving husband and a submissive wife is the best relationship out there. Honestly women who are against this teaching just seem angry to me. No one is forcing you to live this way if you don’t want. I do wonder if they are upset that their worldview leads to less joy.I know some churches may create extra regulations on women but this is generally not the norm. I know all churches I have been to they are involved in almost every facet of the church and do a great job in their roles.

  • wjrorie

    A little disappointing, Chuck. You seemed to go into some detail about church history and other religions, but you failed to explain the true meaning of submission and flesh out the man’s role in a Christian marriage. Fuel for future posts?

  • Rae9

    I will agree that Biblically, Christianity does not condone the oppression of women. However, I do believe that prejudices against women still have managed to seep into the church. Women still have a long way to go when gaining equality in the church. In my church, a non-denominational (“modern”) church, it’s ok if as woman you want to serve in a Bible study or in another ministry, but you will never preach during a service. As a woman there is this unspoken role you are supposed to play and if you don’t fit into that box then there is a good chance your views will not be supported. Even in talking with other women who have become ordained pastors, you will hear stories of how they had to struggle and compete with male leaders who held personal prejudices when the women were just trying to obey God and pursue their given gifts in pastoral care and sermon giving. While I don’t believe the Christian church is outwardly oppressive of women and where I do believe there are Christian women who lead happy, fulfilling lives, many church doctrine hold men at the “head of the church,” when the Bible clearly states that role has been given to Jesus. To say there is no gender problems in Christianity is just being ignorant.

  • Messier45

    Re comment: “In my experience christian women are some of the happiest, best treated women I know. I have to think that having a loving husband and a submissive wife is the best relationship out there.” My comment: Happy pigs make the best pork chops.

  • Messier45

    Re comment: “In my experience christian women are some of the happiest, best treated women I know. I have to think that having a loving husband and a submissive wife is the best relationship out there.” My comment: Happy pigs make the best pork chops.

  • kert1

    Actually equality does not mean exactly the same. I think this is a big misconceptions. If we treated everyone exactly the same, life would have many problems, and be pretty boring besides.We treat people with handicaps differently than those without. This is because there situation is much different. To treat them equally is unfair. Men and women are very differnt and I don’t want to be treated as a women. In fact, it is impossible in some ways, just think back to human anatomy. I have met very few women that really want to be treated like a man, and most of them I would disagree with on most things.I really don’t think man=women. I think we need our differences. Honestly, that’s how God made us. I am more interested in fairness. Treating people fair is what really matters.

  • ThomasBaum

    KERT1 You wrote, ” Treating people fair is what really matters.”.Two of the things that I was taught in second grade were: God is Love and We are all equal in God’s Eyes.We are all individual people and every human being ever is different than every other human being.Being equal in God’s Eyes means that He cares equally for each and every one of us and that sure does upset a lot of people that know His Name but don’t seem to know anything else about Him.Being a Christian is not trying to cram the bible down other people’s throats but it is trying to follow Jesus and it sure does seem that there are many people that don’t believe that Jesus is Who He Is and that is God-Incarnate, that somehow seem to follow Jesus much better than some that believe He is Who He is.Take care, be ready.Sincerely, Thomas Paul Moses Baum.

  • paustak

    You may think this sounds politically correct or even Biblically corrent, but I think you’re wrong. Complementarianism is the equivalent to the back of the bus during the Civil Rights movement. God gave us BOTH control over the Earth in Eden, it didn’t take long for us to ruin that, I admit. However, when Jesus died and was resurrected, he established an egalitarian relationship between races, genders and religions (Jews and non-Jews). Please fast forward your thinking beyond a few verses written by Paul and take the ideas and concepts laid out by Jesus contextually. Thanks.

  • DMZ1

    Gee, separate but equal or, more precisely, different but equal. Where have we heard that before Chuck. Equality means the same, exactly the same. If roles are different, they are not equal. Christianity has NEVER supported equality of women.

  • twmatthews

    Chuck, In reality, all laws against discrimination and in favor of equality were formulated by secular governments and not by religions who, to this day, try to justify their unequal treatment of people.

  • Solkhar

    Deear Mr Colsen, I refer to your opening remark “and the way in which some religions, like Islam, oppress women — “.I find your blatant verbatum comment incorrect and to be frank rather offensive, especially in this current climate, as it only increases the hysteria and misconceptions that exist against Islam.Islam’s core beliefs certainly does not repress the female gender. As another commenter made, equality does not mean identical. In Islam it is made clear that for biological and thus social roles there is a difference and from that the roles and obligations for both women and men are clear, such as motherhood and keeping the fabric of family life for women and for men protecting and feeding the family, particapating in community life. Islamic principles does not preclude women from community activity and even politics but based on the fact that the obligations are also fulfilled.Please, do not generalise and certainly do not confuse the actions of fundamentalists and those from tribal areas that confuse (by ignorance or on purpose) there own sexist tribal behaviour with the core principles of Islam.