In defense of Thurgood Marshall

Not often is a saint of the Episcopal Church attacked in the chambers of the United States Senate, but incredibly, … Continued

Not often is a saint of the Episcopal Church attacked in the chambers of the United States Senate, but incredibly, it has happened this week, during the Elena Kagan confirmation hearings. As we prepare to celebrate our cherished American values of equality and justice on Independence Day, we must also rise to defend the late Justice Thurgood Marshall, an Episcopalian who embodied those ideals.

Marshall is an Episcopal saint. He was the first African American to become a justice of the United States Supreme Court and was the lawyer for the plaintiffs in the landmark Brown vs. Board of Education case that struck down the institutional racism of segregated public schools. He was also a man of deep religious principles. Last summer, the Episcopal Church voted to include him in our book of saints, called Holy Women, Holy Men. May 17, the day of the Brown vs. Board decision, is his feast.

During his years in Washington, Justice Marshall and his family belonged to St. Augustine’s Episcopal Church, where his widow, Sissy, is still an active member. On behalf of all Episcopalians in the Diocese of Washington, I extend to her my sympathy for the hurtful remarks made this week about her late husband. Let me assure Mrs. Marshall and all Episcopalians that our church is resolute in our gratitude for and admiration of Justice Marshall’s legacy, and we pray that we may all receive his exceptional grace and courage to speak the truth.

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  • BarbaraMiles07

    Amen, Amen! Thurgood Marshall believed completely in the American dream and worked to make it reality for all of us. Like the good Episcopalian he was, he was living out his baptismal vows to “strive for justice and peace among all people, and respect the dignity of every human being.” A true patriot, and a Saint!

  • good-bad-n-ugly

    ………. .

  • WmarkW

    The Episcopal Church used to be called “the Republican party at prayer.” That party nominated an Episcopalian for President in 1936, 40, 44, 48, 64, 76, 88 and 92. (You might notice, this generally coincides with the years they lost.) The last three elections, they’ve nominated a cradle member who converted away as an adult.What changed? Both the Republican party and Episcopal church. The Republican’s Southern strategy had to accommodate “the bible says it; I believe it; that settles it” brands of religion. Meanwhile, Episcopalians became too educated to believe in superstitious nonsense. Whether or not Thurgood Marshall is a “saint,” he’s a paradigm of what the modern Episcopal church stands for.

  • areyousaying

    What motivated old white Huckabee Senators from the South and Arizona to attack a dead black man who fought for diversity, tolerance and civil rights?Could it be because these “Christians” hate diversity, tolerance and civil rights as evil hates the light?

  • areyousaying

    WMARKW wrote:The Episcopal Church used to be called “the Republican party at prayer.”Now that’s what they call the Westboro Baptist Church.