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Rig-Veda Book 1 Hymn I. Agni., Rig Veda

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Rig Veda, tr. by Ralph T.H. Griffith, [1896] 1 I Laud Agni, the chosen Priest, God, minister of sacrifice, The hotar, lavishest of wealth. 2 Worthy is Agni to be praised by living as by ancient seers. He shall bring hitherward the Gods. 3 Through Agni man obtaineth wealth, yea, plenty waxing day by day, Most rich in heroes, glorious. 4 Agni, the perfect sacrifice which thou encompassest about Verily goeth to the Gods. 5 May Agni, sapient-minded Priest, truthful, most gloriously great, The God, come hither with the Gods. 6 Whatever blessing, Agni, thou wilt grant unto thy worshipper, That, Aṅgiras, is indeed thy truth. 7 To thee, dispeller of the night, O Agni, day by day with prayer Bringing thee reverence, we come 8 Ruler of sacrifices, guard of Law eternal, radiant One, Increasing in thine own abode. 9 Be to us easy of approach, even as a father to his son: Agni, be with us for our weal.

Table of Contents

Hymn I. Agni.
Hymn Ii. Vyu.
Hymn Iii. Avins
Hymn Iv. Indra
Hymn V. Indra.
Hymn Vi. Indra.
Hymn Vii. Indra.
Hymn Viii. Indra.
Hymn Ix. Indra.
Hymn X. Indra.
Hymn Xi. Indra.
Hymn Xii. Agni.
Hymn Xiii. Agni
Hymn Xiv. Vivedevas.
Hymn Xv. Tu.
Hymn Xvi. Indra.
Hymn Xvii. Indra-Varua
Hymn Xviii. Brahmaaspati.
Hymn Xix. Agni, Maruts.
Hymn Xx. Bhus.
Hymn Xxi. Indra-Agni.
Hymn Xxii. Avins And Others
Hymn Xxiii. Vyu And Others.
Hymn Xxiv. Varua And Others.
Hymn Xxv. Varua.
Hymn Xxvi. Agni.
Hymn Xxvii. Agni.
Hymn Xxviii. Indra, Etc.
Hymn Xxix. Indra.
Hymn Xxx. Indra.
Hymn Xxxi. Agni.
Hymn Xxxii. Indra.
Hymn Xxxiii. Indra.
Hymn Xxxiv. Avins.
Hymn Xxxv. Savitar.
Hymn Xxxvi. Agni.
Hymn Xxxvii. Maruts.
Hymn Xxxviii. Maruts.
Hymn Xxxix Maruts.
Hymn Xl. Brahmaaspati
Hymn Xli. Varua, Mitra, Aryaman.
Hymn Xlii. Pan.
Hymn Xliii. Rudra.
Hymn Xliv. Agni.
Hymn Xlv. Agni.
Hymn Xlvi. Avins.
Hymn Xlvii. Avins.
Hymn Xlviii. Dawn.
Hymn Xlix. Dawn.
Hymn L. Srya.
Hymn Li. Indra.
Hymn Lii. Indra.
Hymn Liii. Indra.
Hymn Liv. Indra.
Hymn Lv. Indra.
Hymn Lvi. Indra.
Hymn Lvii. Indra.
Hymn Lviii. Agni.
Hymn Lix. Agni.
Hymn Lx. Agni.
Hymn Lxi. Indra.
Hymn Lxii. Indra.
Hymn Lxiii. Indra.
Hymn Lxiv. Maruts.
Hymn Lxv. Agni.
Hymn Lxvi. Agni.
Hymn Lxvii. Agni.
Hymn Lxviii. Agni.
Hymn Lxix. Agni.
Hymn Lxx. Agni.
Hymn Lxxi. Agni.
Hymn Lxxii. Agni.
Hymn Lxxiii. Agni.
Hymn Lxxiv. Agni.
Hymn Lxxv. Agni.
Hymn Lxxvi. Agni.
Hymn Lxxvii. Agni.
Hymn Lxxviii. Agni.
Hymn Lxxix. Agni.
Hymn Lxxx. Indra.
Hymn Lxxxi. Indra.
Hymn Lxxxii. Indra.
Hymn Lxxxiii. Indra.
Hymn Lxxxiv. Indra.
Hymn Lxxxv. Maruts.
Hymn Lxxxvi. Maruts.
Hymn Lxxxvii. Maruts.
Hymn Lxxxviii. Maruts.
Hymn Lxxxix. Vivedevas.
Hymn Xc. Vivedevas.
Hymn Xci. Soma.
Hymn Xcii. Dawn.
Hymn Xciii. Agni-Soma.
Hymn Xciv. Agni
Hymn Xcv. Agni
Hymn Xcvi. Agni.
Hymn Xcvii. Agni.
Hymn Xcviii. Agni.
Hymn Xcix. Agni.
Hymn C. Indra.
Hymn Ci. Indra.
Hymn Cii. Indra.
Hymn Ciii. Indra.
Hymn Civ. Indra.
Hymn Cv. Vivedevas.
Hymn Cvi. Vivedevas.
Hymn Cvii. Vivedevas.
Hymn Cviii. Indra-Agni.
Hymn Cix. Indra-Agni.
Hymn Cx. Bhus.
Hymn Cxi. Bhus.
Hymn Cxii. Avins.
Hymn Cxiii. Dawn.
Hymn Cxiv. Rudra.
Hymn Cxv. Srya.
Hymn Cxvi. Avins.
Hymn Cxvii. Avins.
Hymn Cxviii. Avins.
Hymn Cxix. Avins.
Hymn Cxx. Avins.
Hymn Cxxi. Indra.
Hymn Cxxii Vivedevas.
Hymn Cxxiii. Dawn.
Hymn Cxxiv. Dawn.
Hymn Cxxv. Svanaya.
Hymn Cxxvi. Bhvayavya.
Hymn Cxxvii Agni.
Hymn Cxxviii. Agni.
Hymn Cxxix Indra.
Hymn Cxxx. Indra.
Hymn Cxxxi. Indra.
Hymn Cxxxii. Indra.
Hymn Cxxxiii. Indra.
Hymn Cxxxiv. Vyu.
Hymn Cxxxv. Vyu, Indra-Vyu.
Hymn Cxxxvi. Mitra-Varua.
Hymn Cxxxvii. Mitra-Varua.
Hymn Cxxxviii. Pan.
Hymn Cxxxix. Vivedevas.
Hymn Cxl. Agni.
Hymn Cxli. Agni.
Hymn Cxlii. Prs.
Hymn Cxliii. Agni.
Hymn Cxliv. Agni.
Hymn Cxlv. Agni.
Hymn Cxlvi. Agni.
Hymn Cxlvii. Agni.
Hymn Cxlviii. Agni.
Hymn Cxlix. Agni.
Hymn Cl. Agni.
Hymn Cli. Mitra And Varua
Hymn Clii. Mitra-Varua.
Hymn Cliii. Mitra-Varua.
Hymn Cliv. Viu
Hymn Clv. Viu-Indra.
Hymn Clvi. Viu
Hymn Clvii. Avins.
Hymn Clviii. Avins.
Hymn Clix. Heaven And Earth.
Hymn Clx. Heaven And Earth.
Hymn Clxi. Bhus.
Hymn Clxii. The Horse.
Hymn Clxiii. The Horse.
Hymn Clxiv. Vivedevas.
Hymn Clxv. Indra. Maruts.
Hymn Clxvi. Maruts.
Hymn Clxvii. Indra. Maruts.
Hymn Clxviii. Maruts.
Hymn Clxix. Indra.
Hymn Clxx. Indra. Maruts.
Hymn Clxxi. Maruts.
Hymn Clxxii. Maruts.
Hymn Clxxiii. Indra.
Hymn Clxxiv. Indra.
Hymn Clxxv. Indra.
Hymn Clxxvi. Indra.
Hymn Clxxvii. Indra.
Hymn Clxxviii. Indra.
Hymn Clxxix. Rati.
Hymn Clxxx. Avins.
Hymn Clxxxi. Avins
Hymn Clxxxii. Avins.
Hymn Clxxxiii. Avins.
Hymn Clxxxiv. Avins.
Hymn Clxxxv. Heaven And Earth.
Hymn Clxxxvi. Vivedevas.
Hymn Clxxxvii. Praise Of Food.
Hymn Clxxxviii. Prs.
Hymn Clxxxix. Agni.
Hymn Cxc. Bhaspati.
Hymn Cxci. Water. Grass. Sun.

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1 Sarah Mangum = "The Rigveda is a sacred Indo-Aryan collection of Vedic Sanskrit hymns still being used in India. It is counted among the four canonical sacred texts (śruti) of Hinduism known as the Vedas.It is one of the oldest extant texts in any Indo-European language. Philological and linguistic evidence indicate that the Rigveda was composed in the north-western region of the Indian subcontinent, most likely between c. 1500–1200 BCE.The Rigveda contains several mythological and poetic accounts of the origin of the world, hymns praising the gods, and ancient prayers for life, prosperity, etc. Some of its verses are still recited as Hindu prayers, at religious functions and other occasions, making it probably the world's oldest religious texts in continued use.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rigveda"
2 Raymond Huerta = "The Rig Veda is the oldest and most widely regarded divine texts among Hindu traditions. The more complete title is Rig Veda Samhitā. In Sanskrit the word veda means "knowledge," more specifically sacred knowledge. The word "Veda" also appears in the three other divine texts used in Hinduism: Yajur Veda, Sāma Veda, and Atharva Veda. Rig is a transliteration of the Sanskrit word for "praise." Praise and prayers (Mantras) complement critical reflections of rituals and symbolic actions of priests (Brahmana). These traditions constitute the very core of Vedic religion and philosophy, most notably shown in the Rig Veda. With the use of mantras and brahmana, the sages make their voices heard with hymns. There's over one thousand hymns in the Rig Veda. With the help of divine inspiration the followers of Vedic religion and philosophy attribute authorship to various seers. In Book 1 sixteen seers contribute to the composition of the hymns. The first two hymns are attributed to Madhucchandās Vaiśvāmira (meaning 'Sweet Meters'), son of Viśvāmitra. Vedic tradition defines Madhucchandās as Pranah, or the spirit and breath of the Divine Revelations. This is significant to the first hymn because it suggests the honey-like-sweetness of life on Earth foretold through the seer with the help of Agni, the God of fire. Griffith, Ralph T. H. "Introduction." Hinduism: The Rig Veda. Quality Pbk. Book Club ed. New York: Quality Paperback Book Club, 1992. Print.Trikha, Dr. J.K. "Introduction to Hymn 1." Rig Veda: A Scientific and Intellectual Analysis of the Hymns. Somaiya Publications PVT., 1981. Print."
3 Sarah Mangum = "Agni, god of fire"
4 Raymond Huerta = "Agni, the God of fire, is arguably the most prominent of all the deities in the Rig Veda. Agni is the messenger and mediator between heaven and Earth. He announces to the Gods the hymns, conveys to them the oblations of their worshippers, and invites them to the place of sacrifice. Due to the various sacrificial duties Agni embodies, he is called the Purohita or chosen priest. He is also regarded as a Hotar, an invoking priest that calls the Gods to enjoy the offerings. All riches are at his disposal. Agni is able to give lavish rewards to the pious whose offerings he carries to the Gods.Griffith, Ralph T. H. "Book The First." Hinduism: The Rig Veda. Quality Pbk. Book Club ed. New York: Quality Paperback Book Club, 1992. Print."
5 Raymond Huerta = "The presence of ancient seers implies the existence of lost or undiscovered hymns predating Hymn 1.Griffith, Ralph T. H. "Book The First." Hinduism: The Rig Veda. Quality Pbk. Book Club ed. New York: Quality Paperback Book Club, 1992. Print."
6 Enakshi Ganguly = "Agni was seen as a messenger to the Gods. Most religious rituals, such as getting married, involve using fire. Various chants are recited and different types of spices are thrown into the fire to appease and garner blessings from the Gods. "
7 Raymond Huerta = "Heroes are brave sons and dependents who acquire wealth through their offerings to the Gods via Agni. Griffith, Ralph T. H. "Book The First." Hinduism: The Rig Veda. Quality Pbk. Book Club ed. New York: Quality Paperback Book Club, 1992. Print."
8 Raymond Huerta = "In a perfect sacrifice, Agni is able to ward off the Rāksasas (fiends), who attempt to interrupt the ritual. If the sacrifice is not perfect the Rāksasas have thus succeeded in interrupting the ritual.Griffith, Ralph T. H. "Book The First." Hinduism: The Rig Veda. Quality Pbk. Book Club ed. New York: Quality Paperback Book Club, 1992. Print."
9 Raymond Huerta = "The Angirases were regarded as a race of higher beings somewhere between men and Gods. Their sacrificing rituals set the precedent for later priests to follow. Griffith, Ralph T. H. "Book The First." Hinduism: The Rig Veda. Quality Pbk. Book Club ed. New York: Quality Paperback Book Club, 1992. Print."
10 Raymond Huerta = "The eternal law is used to describe the conception of the order of the world. Every facet of the universe is believed to be managed by these ordinances or rtá, the Sanskrit word for eternal law."In thine own abode," is the sacrificial hall where fire-worship is performed. Griffith, Ralph T. H. "Book The First." Hinduism: The Rig Veda. Quality Pbk. Book Club ed. New York: Quality Paperback Book Club, 1992. Print."
11 Enakshi Ganguly = "Agni, the word for fire in Sanskrit, was seen as a strong and immortal force. The ability of to be lighted and relighted is believed to show its immortal nature. Thus, unlike humans, Agni is everlasting and powerful. Through the Vedic chants on Agni, it was believed that Agni's strength could be bestowed upon those who chanted it. "