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Treatise XI. Idolatry Chapter V, The Talmud

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The Talmud, by Joseph Barclay, [1878] 1. "Has an idolater hired an Israelite to make with him wine of idolatrous libation?" "His wages are forbidden." "But if he hired him to do with him another work, even though he say to him, 'carry for me a barrel of wine of libation from place to place?'" "His wages are allowed." "Has one hired an ass to bring on him wine of idolatrous libation?" "The hire is not allowed." "Has one hired out the ass for riding, even though the idolater put his wine flask upon hire?" The hire is allowed." 2. Wine of idolatrous libation which fell on grapes must be cleansed away, and they are allowed. But if the grapes be crushed, they are forbidden. "Has the idolatrous wine fallen on figs or on dates?" "If it convey to them a taste, they are forbidden." It happened once with Baithus, son of Zonan, that he brought dried figs in a boat, and a barrel of wine of idolatrous libation was broken, and it fell upon them, and he consulted the Sages and they allowed them. This is the rule, In every use where the taste is conveyed, it is forbidden. But where in its use no taste is conveyed, it is allowed. It is like vinegar which has fallen on peas. 3. "An idolater who was carrying with an Israelite pitchers of wine from place to place?" "If it be certain that the idolater is watched, it is allowed." "If the Israelite let him know that he is departing—if there be time to bore, to close, and to seal the pitcher?" R. Simon, son of Gamaliel, said, "it is not allowed if there be time to open, to cork, and to seal it again." "And an Israelite put his wine into a carriage, or into a boat, and he has gone a near cut—he entered the city and washed?" "It is allowed." "But if he let the idolater know that he is departing, if there be time to bore, and cork, and seal it again?" R. Simon, son of Gamaliel, said, "it is not allowed if there be time to open the barrel and cork and seal it again." "If he leave the idolater in the wine-shop, even though he go in and out?" "It is allowed." "But if he let the idolater know that he departs, if there be time to bore, and cork, and seal it again?" R. Simon ben Gamaliel said, "it is not allowed if there be time to open, and to cork, and to seal it again." "Did he dine with the idolater at table, and he left a flask on the table, and a flask on the sideboard, and he left them and went out?" "That one which is on the table is forbidden, but that one on the sideboard is allowed." "But if be said to him, 'you may mix and drink wine, even that one on the sideboard is forbidden.'" 1 "Open barrels are forbidden, also sealed ones, when there is time to open, and cork, and seal them up again." 4. If foreign banditti have entered into a city in time of peace, open barrels are forbidden—closed ones are allowed. If the banditti have entered in time of war, both are equally allowed, because there is no time for idolatrous libation. 5. When an idolater has sent to workmen of Israel a barrel of wine of idolatrous libation for wages, it is allowed to say, "give us its value." "But if it has come into their possession?" "It is forbidden." 6. "Has one sold wine to an idolater?" "If he agreed for the price before it is measured, its payment is allowed." "Has he measured it before he agreed for the price?" "Its payment is forbidden." 7. "Has one taken a funnel. and measured wine into the bottle of an idolater, and he then turned round and measured wine into the bottle of an Israelite?" "If the funnel retain a drop of the wine of the idolater, the wine is forbidden." "Has one poured the wine from vessel to vessel?" "That vessel from which he poured it is allowed, and that one into which he poured it is forbidden." 8. Wine of idolatrous libation is forbidden, and even a little of it renders forbidden—wine in wine, and water in water—how much soever they be, and wine in water, and water in wine, in giving a taste. This is the rule,—If both be of one sort, however little; if they be of different sorts, in giving a taste. 9. These things are forbidden, and even a little of them renders other things forbidden. Wine of idolatrous libation, and idols, and skins of beasts with the hearts torn out, and an ox that was stoned, 1 and an heifer that is beheaded, 2 and the birds from the leprosy, and the hair of the Nazarite, 3 and the first-born of the ass, and flesh in milk, and the scapegoat, and the profane animals 4 which were slaughtered in the Temple court. These are forbidden to be mixed with other things; and if so mixed, even a little of them renders other things forbidden. 10. "Wine of idolatrous libation which has fallen into a vat?" "All its use is forbidden." R. Simon ben Gamaliel said, "it may all be sold to heathens, excepting the value of the wine of idolatrous libation which is in it." 11. "A stone press which an idolater has prepared with pitch?" "It must be cleansed, and it is clean." "And if of wood?" Rabbi said, "it should be cleansed;" and the Sages said, "one must peel off the pitch; but if it be made of earthenware, even though one peel off the pitch, it is forbidden." 12. "If one buy culinary utensils from an idolater?" "That which it is usual to dip (in water), one must dip; to scour, one must scour; to whiten in the fire, one must whiten in fire. The spit and the fork, one must whiten in the fire; 1 and the knife must be rubbed down, and it is clean." 215:1 Because the idolater might have made an idolatrous libation from both flasks. 216:1 Exod. xxi. 29. 216:2 Deut. xxi. 4. 216:3 Numb. vi. 18. 216:4 This refers to the killing or slaughtering of cattle and fowls for profane or domestic purposes. They were called profane to distinguish them from the holy sacrifices. 217:1 Numb. xxxi. 23.

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1 Ahmed M = "Ritual slaughter involves a prescribed method of slaughtering an animal for food production purposes."
2 Ahmed M = "This differs from animal sacrifices that involve slaughtering animals, often in the context of rituals, for purposes other than mere food production."
3 Ahmed M = "Shechita is the Jewish ritual slaughter for poultry and cattle for food according to Halakha. "