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The great Talmudic sage Hillel was born in Babylonia in the first century BCE. As young man he came to the Holy Land to study Torah at the feet of the sages of Jerusalem. He was initially a very poor, but brilliant student, and became a famous Torah scholar and eventually the Nasi (Prince) of the Sanhedrin. He is often mentioned together with his colleague, Shammai, with who he often disagreed on the interpretations of Torah law: Shammai often followed the stricter interpretation, whereas Hillel tended toward a more lenient understanding of the law. In the great majority of cases, his opinion prevailed. Hillel encouraged his disciples to follow the example of Aaron the High Priest to "love peace and pursue peace, love all God's creations and bring them close to the Torah." Hillel was a very humble and patient man, and there are many stories that illustrate this. One of the most famous accounts in the Talmud (Shabbat 31a) tells about a gentile who wanted to convert to Judaism. This happened not infrequently, and this individual stated that he would accept Judaism only if a rabbi would teach him the entire Torah while he, the prospective convert, stood on one foot. First he went to Shammai, who, insulted by this ridiculous request, threw him out of the house. The man did not give up and went to Hillel. This gentle sage accepted the challenge, and said: "What is hateful to you, do not do to your neighbor. That is the whole Torah; the rest is the explanation of this, now go and study it!"