Are we there yet?

The above sounds like an innocuous enough question, that is, until it is uttered by a child or even worse, multiple children! Add the following factors: being trapped in a car with said children; heat, and a 2+ hour travel time, and the question becomes a feared one!

Driving to our recent holiday, I was treated to a splendid rendition of the ‘Are we there yets?’ by my children and, while I understood their excitement and perhaps admired their consistency (said on a loop for over three hours), it was with much relief and with very little patience left that I was finally able to say, “YES! WE ARE!”

I could identity with my children’s impatient questioning (I was perhaps even more keen than them to escape the car and the questions); the start of a journey is exciting, and I could certainly understand my children’s eagerness to reach our destination.

In the small moments when I was not answering questions, I reflected upon their excitement and on my own.

Naturally, most of us are full of excitement when travelling on holiday, and we can enjoy the excited build-up and the sense of adventure travelling affords.

I don’t know, however, if I would ever have associated (before coming to faith) the joy and excitement of my children travelling, with following Jesus. I never thought of Christianity as something you could be excited about;I didn’t know anything then (I now realise) about Joy!

Yet, my experience of travelling with Jesus – of following him – has been a journey filled with excitement and, at times, great joy.

Journey of faith

“I believe that nothing will happen that will outweigh the supreme advantage of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord” Phil 3:8-9

To follow Jesus is a journey.

When I made a decision to follow Jesus, I committed myself to a new path, to a new life in Christ and a new journey began for me. In a short time, I have already travelled far. Knowing Jesus has already changed and shaped my life in truly wonderful ways, and I find myself walking a path I could never have imagined or even hoped for before.

Yet I still have a long way to go, and I sometimes feel like my excited children: impatient and eager to reach the destination. At other times, I feel fearful; I feel like I’m losing direction or unsure of where I’m going. It’s not always easy to trust in the path laid out for us, to follow with faith, to keep our eyes fixed, not on the road, but on the guide.

Keep your eyes on Jesus

There are times when I stumble. Times when I need to remember to stop and be still. Times when I need to seek the Lord in prayer to ask for his help or guidance. But I have, in my journey of faith, never yet felt lost.

And I do still remember what it feels like to feel truly lost. I can still remember that darkness, its totality.

I was once so lost and so far from God that it would have been impossible for me to even begin to imagine the freedom and peace I could feel now.

Yet, here I am.

When I think back from where I was before, to where I am now, I am filled with such gratitude to the Lord that I could weep (and often do)! Knowing Jesus has set me free to choose my own path, I choose to follow him. Freely and joyfully, I walk now with faith-filled footsteps, trusting not in myself, but in Him. I no longer walk in darkness, but in the light!

‘So, am I there yet?  No, but I am well on my way and am learning to appreciate and be thankful for the journey itself.’

“Not that I have become perfect yet: I have not yet won, but I am still running, trying to capture the prize for which Christ Jesus captured me. I can assure you my brothers, I am far from thinking I have already won. All I can say is I forget the past and I strain ahead for what is still to come; I am racing for the finish, for the prize to which God calls us upwards to receive in Christ Jesus.” Phil 3:8-9

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